Malone Memorial Arch and Gates

King Edward Park, Fenton Street And Portia Street, Stratford

  • Malone Memorial Arch and Gates.
    Copyright: Stratford District Council. Date: 24/10/2008.
  • Malone Memorial Arch and Gates.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: B Wagstaff. Date: 16/11/2014.
  • Malone Memorial Arch and Gates. Rear of the memorial.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: B Wagstaff. Date: 16/11/2014.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Able to Visit
List Number 921 Date Entered 1st September 1983

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

Extent includes the land described as Sec 1036 Town of Stratford, part of the land described as Sec 484 Town of Stratford (NZ Gazette 1982, p. 184, CT 495617), part of the land described as Legal Road, Taranaki Land District, and the structure known as Malone Memorial Arch and Gates, including the concrete fence, thereon. Refer to the extent map tabled at the Heritage New Zealand Board meeting on 11 December 2014.

City/District Council

Stratford District

Region

Taranaki Region

Legal description

Sec 1036, Sec 484 Town of Stratford (NZ Gazette 1982, p. 184, CT 495617) and Legal Road, Taranaki Land District

Summaryopen/close

Erected in 1923 at the entrance to Stratford’s King Edward Park, the Malone Memorial Arch and Gates are of historical, aesthetic and social heritage significance. The memorial, thought to be one of the largest monuments to an individual in New Zealand, commemorates Lieutenant Colonel William Malone, a local man who was the commanding officer of the Wellington Battalion of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in the First World War. Malone was killed in action at Chunuk Bair, Gallipoli, and is remembered as one of New Zealand’s outstanding soldiers of the campaign.

William George Malone was born in England in 1859. In 1880, he immigrated to New Zealand to join his brother, and was in the Armed Constabulary at Opunake for two years, including during the 1881 attack on Parihaka. The brothers then farmed land at Puniwhakau near Stratford. William became very active in the local community while also raising a family and running a land agency. He was on a number of community boards and the Hawera and Stratford County Councils. In 1890, he added to his workload by studying law during the evenings, qualifying in 1894.

Malone’s association with the military had begun in England, and he served in a number of capacities throughout his life in New Zealand. He is credited with introducing the distinctive New Zealand military ‘lemon squeezer’ hat shape in 1911, created to improve rain runoff and also to resemble Mount Taranaki. His military experience saw him appointed commander of the Wellington Battalion of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force at the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, when he was 56. The Battalion was sent to Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, and Malone immediately began consolidating the ANZAC Corps perimeter. His battalion played a pivotal role in the ANZAC offensive, securing the position of Chunuk Bair early on 8 August. Having seen the heavy losses suffered by the Auckland Battalion during daylight, Malone had argued for the attack to be delayed until dark as his men ‘were not going to commit suicide’. However, at 5pm later that day Malone was killed by supporting artillery fire.

He is one of the 310 Wellington soldiers with no known grave. To honour his memory, eight years to the day after his death, the Wellington Battalion unveiled the arch and gates in King Edward Park in front of a large crowd including ‘old friends and comrades’, Malone family members and dignitaries. Designed by John Alfred Duffill (Duffill & Gibson), the plastered concrete arch is set between two solid squared posts, and rises to a peak at the apex of which is a circular medallion, topped by a flagpole. A low wall and smaller gate flanks each side of the main entrance gates; the original wooden gates have since been replaced with metal ones. The Malone gates have been the site for annual memorial services, on the anniversary of the battle for Chunuk Bair.

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Construction Professionalsopen/close

Duffill & Gibson

No biography is currently available for this construction professional

Moore, C.

No biography is currently available for this construction professional

Additional informationopen/close

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1923 -

Modification
-
Original wooden entrance gates and side gates replaced with iron gates

Completion Date

17th November 2014

Report Written By

Blyss Wagstaff

Other Information

A fully referenced upgrade report is available on request from the Central Regional Office of Heritage New Zealand.

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.