Huxtable Residence (Former)

233 Highgate, Dunedin

  • Original image submitted at time of registration.
    Copyright: NZHPT Field Record Form Collection. Taken By: Lois Galer. Date: 11/05/1994.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 2167 Date Entered 2nd July 1982

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

Extent includes the land described as Lot 6 DEED 58 (OT146/149), Otago Land District, and the building known as Huxtable Residence (Former), thereon.

City/District Council

Dunedin City

Region

Otago Region

Legal description

Lot 6 DEED 58 (OT146/149), Otago Land District

Summaryopen/close

This 1907 brick and tile residence, designed by Dunedin architect Edward Walden for Anna and Alexander Huxtable, is a beautifully detailed example of an Edwardian villa. The house has historic and architectural significance.

Anna Huxtable was granted this land in 1907; a survey on 15 May 1907 indicates the foundations for the new dwelling were already in place at that date. Dunedin City Council records indicate that this house was probably built around that time – there are drainage records from 1909. Anna was married to Alexander Murray Huxtable. Murray (as he signs himself in contemporary newspapers), was the manufacturer of ‘Huxtable Anti-Catarrh Inhalers’ advertised in 1910s as manufactured in High Street, Roslyn. He described himself in directories as a both a commercial agent and patent medicine manufacturer at different times. He was son of John Huxtable a well-known businessman in Australia, who later moved to Dunedin, and spent his last years at his son’s house.

Architect Edward Walden (1870-1944) was born in Dunedin and educated at Otago Boys' High School. He began his architectural career articled to James Hislop. He became a partner in the Dunedin firm of Hislop and Walden, and when Hislop died in 1902, he took over the firm. Walden was responsible for the first abattoirs erected in New Zealand, Hallenstein's Building on the Octagon, a church at Anderson's Bay and Levin and Company's Building, Dunedin. His son also Eric practised architecture at Nelson.

In 1917, Anna Huxtable sold the property to Minnie Begg. She had lived with her husband Adam. After Begg’s death in 1951, the property was transferred to Dunedin works manager William Robinson.

The house is an example of a generous brick and tile bay villa from the early years of the twentieth century. Notable architectural features include the stick work on the gable, brackets supporting the gables, tile roof with decorative ridge capping, and the cast iron lacework. In 2016, the house remains a private residence.

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Construction Professionalsopen/close

Walden, Edward Walter

Walden was born (b.1870) in Dunedin and educated at Otago Boys' High School. He began his architectural career articled to James Hislop. He became a partner in the Dunedin firm of Hislop and Walden, and when Hislop died in 1902, he took over the firm.

Walden was responsible for the first abattoirs erected in New Zealand, Hallenstein's Building on the Octagon, a church at Anderson's Bay and Levin and Company's Building, Dunedin.

His son Eric practised architecture at Nelson.

Additional informationopen/close

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1907 -

Completion Date

6th December 2016

Report Written By

Heather Bauchop

Other Information

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.

A fully referenced upgrade report is available on request from the Otago/Southland Area Office of Heritage New Zealand.