Moata

434 High St, Dunedin

  • Moata.
    Copyright: Philip Tilson. Taken By: Philip Tilson. Date: 17/03/2009.
  • .
    Copyright: Philip Tilson. Taken By: Philip Tilson. Date: 17/03/2009.
  • .
    Copyright: Philip Tilson. Taken By: Philip Tilson. Date: 17/03/2009.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 2195 Date Entered 2nd July 1982

Locationopen/close

City/District Council

Dunedin City

Region

Otago Region

Legal description

Pt Secs 26/28 & 36 Blk 2 Town of Dunedin

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Construction Professionalsopen/close

Salmond, James Louis

James Louis Salmond (1868-1950) was born in North Shields, England. He was educated at Otago Boys' High School and began his career articled to Robert Arthur Lawson (1833-1902). Salmond initially practised on his own account but later rejoined Lawson in partnership. Salmond took over the practice when Lawson died in 1902.

Salmond was the architect of over 20 churches in Otago including the Presbyterian churches at Roslyn, Kaikorai, North Dunedin and the Wesleyan church at Mornington. He designed many private residences including Watson Shennan's house at 367 High Street, as well as those at 114 Cargill Street and 14 Pitt Street, all in Dunedin.

Salmond was president of the Otago Art Society, and also served a term as president of the New Zealand Institute of Architects.

His son Arthur joined the firm having studied in London and his grandson John continues to work in the firm today. It is now known as Salmond Anderson Architects.

Additional informationopen/close

Notable Features

See "in the light of the past' Phillips & Mclean, pp.65 et al.

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1900 -

Other Information

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.