Gerrard's Private Railway Hotel

1-3 Leven Street, Invercargill

  • Gerrard's Private Railway Hotel.
    Copyright: Miles Hewton Photography.
  • Gerrard's Private Railway Hotel. Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Shellie Evans - flyingkiwigirl. Taken By: Shellie Evans - flyingkiwigirl. Date: 1/01/2014.
  • Gerrard's Private Railway Hotel. Image courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.
    Copyright: Karora - Wikimedia Commons. Taken By: Karora - Wikimedia Commons. Date: 29/09/2013.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 1 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 2506 Date Entered 28th June 1990

Locationopen/close

City/District Council

Invercargill City

Region

Southland Region

Legal description

Lot 2 DP 3130 Pt Lot 1 DP 4200 Pt Secs 10 & 11 Town of Inver.

Summaryopen/close

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The present Railway Hotel, was built in 1896 to replace an earlier wooden hotel which stood on the site from 1876. Designed by McKenzie and Gilbertson it was built by W Crowther. In 1907 a three storey extension on the north side was opened and some years later part of the structure on Esk Street was removed because it encroached on a neighbouring section.

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

There has been hotel business on this site for 113 years and in the present building for 93 years.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

ARCHITECTURAL QUALITY:

The building is a competent, well-mannered essay in Edwardian Free style commercial architecture, the qualities of which can be summarised in the free asymmetrical planning of the building and in the external composition of the facades impressing fitness of purpose.

TOWNSCAPE/LANDMARK VALUE:

This hotel has long been a prominent landmark in Invercargill and remains so today.

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Construction Professionalsopen/close

Brodrick, Cuthbert John

Cuthbert John Brodrick (1867-1946) was born in Invercargill, the fifth son of Thomas Brodrick. He was named for his uncle, the well-known Victorian architect Cuthbert Brodrick (1822-1905). Brodrick was educated at Southland Boys High School. In 1884 Brodrick was articled to F.W. Burwell and trained in the classical tradition, travelling to Melbourne with Burwell to complete his training. Brodrick returned to New Zealand in 1891 after architectural draughting in Queensland for the Government. In 1906 he married Jemima ('Nonnie') Thomson, stepdaughter of surveyor John Turnbull Thomson.

After practising in Hawera for six years he returned to Invercargill. Brodrick entered into a partnership with his pupil Thomas Royds during World War One. Royds died in 1936. Brodrick retired from practice about 1943. During his career, he served as President of the Institute of Architects in 1911, as Vice-President in 1917, and as a member of the council in 1935.

The first building he designed in Invercargill was the Alexandra building. Others (with partner Thomas Royds) included the Italian Renaissance Bank of New South Wales (1912), the Kaiapoi building, the Grand Hotel (1914), the Edwardian Baroque Southland Daily News (1913), the stripped Classical Invercargill Savings Bank (1926), the classical temple Masonic Lodge of St John (1926), the Georgian Waimahaka Homestead, and grandstands for the Southland Racing Club.

Brodrick was also a member of the Borough Council for three terms and became Deputy Mayor.

Gilbertson, Charles

Charles Gilbertson's biographical details are not known but he is thought to have come to New Zealand from England. He was in partnership with one McKenzie until the latter went to Dunedin, leaving Gilbertson retaining the name of the firm, McKenzie and Gilbertson, in Invercargill. Gilbertson was responsible for many designs in Southland including the Invercargill Club and Christ Church, Clifton.

Additional informationopen/close

Physical Description

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION:

The main part of the building is symmetrical; the entrance is flanked on either side by four partially arched windows with ornamental square-headed windows with hood mould and ornamental keystones. The first floor central window is made up of three semi-circular arched windows with imposts and mouldings. These open on to a balcony with stone balustrading above the main entrance. There are further arched windows on either side resembling the main windows, except in having keystones; the same style of windows is continued on the 1907 addition.

An elaborate parapet is made up of triangular pediments, stone balustrading, urns and an octagonal tower above the central window, the tower also having arched windows. Its octagonal ogee-shaped cupola has a cast-iron finial.

The hotel is a colonial variation of the Edwardian Free style with borrowings from the Italianate, Queen Anne and Baroque Revival architecture popular in New Zealand at the time it was built. Queen Anne elements include the variety and placement of the windows, but more particularly the free use of a picturesque parapet with pediments, balustrades and a tower. More in the Italianate mode are the wide squareheaded window heads with hood moulds, the string courses, brackets, cornice and parapet. Baroque Revival elements may be seen in the style of the roof pediments which show a Dutch influenced Wren style.

MODIFICATIONS:

In 1907 a three-storey addition to the north along Leven Street was completed in a style resembling that of the original section. Later the 1896 structure was further amended by the removal of a portion of the building facing Esk Street.

The hotel has been extensively renovated and updated. A fire escape now extends around the building at the level of the first floor windows.

Notable Features

Virtually unmodified Queen Anne decoration.

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1896 -

Addition
1907 -
Three story addition to the north along Leven Street

Construction Details

Brick with stone facings, window surrounds and parapet decoration. Internal joinery is wooden including the stair balustrade, doors and double hung windows.

Completion Date

2nd February 1990

Information Sources

Porter, 1983

Frances Porter (ed), Historic Buildings of Dunedin, South Island, Methuen, Auckland, 1983.

Other Information

A copy of this report is available from the NZHPT Southern Region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.