Savoy Restaurant (Formerly Haynes Building)

50 Princes Street, Dunedin

  • Savoy Restaurant (Formerly Haynes Building). Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Derek Smith. Taken By: Derek Smith. Date: 21/08/2010.
  • Image courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.
    Copyright: Ben Hill Wikimedia Commons. Taken By: Ben Hill. Date: 14/08/2009.
  • Image courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.
    Copyright: Ben Hill Wikimedia Commons. Taken By: Ben Hill. Date: 14/08/2009.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Registered List Entry Type Historic Place Category 1
List Number 378 Date Entered 6th September 1984

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City/District Council

Dunedin City

Region

Otago Region

Legal description

Lots 5/13 15/23 DP 5203

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This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. The following text is the original citation considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The Savoy Restaurant building was constructed in 1914 on the site previously occupied by the Criterion Hotel.

The original building comprised only the corner portion of the structure as it now stands. During the 1920s it was enlarged with a three-storeyed north wing linking the building more harmoniously with the main Herbert Haynes building and an extension to its Moray place frontage.

The building has a striking ornamental façade featuring round headed windows with prominent keystones, a carved entablative crowning the second storey and a lanterned dome on an ornamental drum over the corner section. The building is beautifully proportioned to suit a corner site.

The original owner of the building was Daniel Haynes, partner of the former drapery firm of Herbert Haynes Limited, which later became DIC Limited. Daniel Haynes Trust held the leases until 1973 when the building was purchased by Edgar of St Clair Investment Limited.

Dawsons Jewellers originally occupied the ground floor corner section (now occupied by Daniels Jewellers Limited). Inside the former Dawsons Jewellers were magnificent oak tables (now in Arthur Barnetts) and walnut showcases (only one of which remains).

The Savoy Grill Room was opened on the top floor by Mr & Mrs P. Barling, who later opened the Warwick Room on the first floor corner. After the new wing was completed they opened, in 1923, the Tudor Hall, which adjourned the Clarence Room (now Tudor Lounge).

Once considered the finest dining room interior in the Southern Hemisphere, Tudor Hall features dark English oak panelling a magnificent English oak and Oamaru stone fireplace surround, arches, leadlights and stained glass windows. The Elizabethan décor includes imported light fittings and reproduced antique design furniture. Despite fires between 1967 and 1970 the interior has remained virtually the same but it does not attract the large number of guests which it had during the 1920s and 1930s.

Both the street façade and the interior details of this building have architectural value.

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