Arden House

107 Kopanga Road, Havelock North

  • Arden House, Havelock North.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: Alison Dangerfield. Date: 22/03/2007.
  • Arden House, Havelock North. Image included in Field Record Form Collection.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: Chris Cochran. Date: 1/11/1986.
  • Arden House, Havelock North. Image included in Field Record Form Collection.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: Chris Cochran. Date: 1/11/1986.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 1 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 4410 Date Entered 16th November 1989

Locationopen/close

City/District Council

Hastings District

Region

Hawke's Bay Region

Legal description

Pt Lot 2 DP7045 (CT HB99501), Hawke's Bay Land District

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The historical significance of Arden lies in its associations with the Chambers family of Havelock North. Arden was built for Maurice Stirling Chambers, the third son of Thomas Mason Chambers. Maurice was a farmer and had bought the station Tauroa from his father in February 1918. As well as farming Tauroa he managed Kopanga, (his brother Selwyn's property) for Selwyn's widow and son. In 1919 Maurice married Mirima Bartley and they moved into Kopanga living there until Arden was built in 1926.

Arden is part of the Chambers family history and is linked to the other Chambers family houses. These have a common family growth and inter-relationship.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Arden is one of four large country houses designed by Gummer in the Havelock North area over a period of twenty years from 1916. These houses, collectively and singularly, make a significant contribution to the history of architectural design in New Zealand. Gummers familiarity with a wide range of styles was exhibited in these houses and they were each quite different. Arden, a relatively formal design with a symmetrical facade, exhibits both the architect's case with the stripped Classical style and the consistent use of superior materials and workmanship.

TOWNSCAPE/LANDMARK SIGNIFICANCE:

From a distance Arden Lodge with its white stucco exterior makes a strong visual statement amidst the rolling hills that surround the property. From close it is also an impressive sight.

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Construction Professionalsopen/close

Gummer & Ford

The architectural partnership of Gummer and Ford was established in 1923, and became one of national importance.

William Henry Gummer (1884-1966) was articled to W.A. Holman, an Auckland architect, and was elected as an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1910. In the period 1908-1913 he travelled in the United Kingdom, Europe and the United States. During this time he worked for Sir Edwin Lutyens, leading English architect of the time, and for Daniel Burnham in Chicago. Burnham was a major American architect and one of the founders of the influential Chicago School of Architecture. Gummer joined the firm of Hoggard and Prouse of Auckland and Wellington in 1913. In 1914 he was elected a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Architects, was president of the Institute from 1933-34 and was later elected a life member.

Charles Reginald Ford (1880- 1972) was born in England and served in the Royal Navy. He was later with Captain Scott's 1901-1904 expedition to Antarctica. He trained as an architect working in Wanganui as an engineer. In 1926 he wrote the first treatise on earthquake and

building construction in the English language. Ford was president of the New Zealand Institute of Architects from 1921-22.

Buildings designed by the partnership include the State Insurance Building Wellington, (1940) the Dilworth Building (1926), the Guardian Trust Building and the Domain Wintergardens (1921 and 1928), all in Auckland, and the Dominion Museum (1936) in Wellington. Gummer and Ford were awarded Gold Medals from the New Zealand Institute of Architects for the designs of Auckland Railway Station and Remuera Library.

Gummer was one of the most outstanding architects working in New Zealand in the first half of this century and was responsible for the stylistically and structurally advanced Tauroa (1916), Craggy Range (1919), Arden (1926), and Te Mata (1935) homesteads at Havelock North.

Additional informationopen/close

Physical Description

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION (STYLE):

Arden Lodge is an impressive two storeyed house built in a Stripped Classical style. The white stucco finish, balconies and arches convey an Italianate/Mediterranean feeling to the design. The house is enhanced by very fine detailing incorporating the roundheaded windows. Other notable features of the house include the totara staircase on the first landing, opposite which is a finely detailed 'Juliet' balcony.

Between the balusters is a distinctive geometric design which reappears elsewhere in the house and is also a feature of the upper portion of the main facade. Another unusual detail of Arden are the semi-circular fanlights over the French doors which open out from the sunroom onto the terrace.

MODIFICATIONS:

In 1985-86 a number of additions and alterations were carried out for Mr and Mrs R. Lowe, then owners of Arden Lodge.

On the ground floor a Porte Cochere was built in the Gummer style. A new kitchen and servery was built and a hole cut in the wall between these rooms. The original washhouse and workshop was converted into a guest suite and some windows were altered to a terrace door. The enclosed double garage was altered into a full sized billiard room. On the first floor four guest bedrooms were designed within existing rooms with their own bathrooms and sitting area.

Notable Features

The 'Juliet' balcony

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1926 -

Construction Details

Arden is principally constructed of reinforced concrete and brickwork. There is a reinforced concrete first floor and roof slab with a bituminous covering. At ground floor level the majority of the floor timber is jarrah with the exception of the hall entrance and one or two small rooms in the staff accommodation area. The joinery is totara. Both exterior and interior brick and concrete walls, partitions and ceilings have a plaster finish.

Completion Date

28th April 1989

Information Sources

Dominion

Dominion

Estate Realities (Auction) Dominion 24 October 1987

Shanahan, 1983

Kieran J Shanahan, The Work of William H. Gummer, Architect, Thesis, University of Auckland, Auckland, 1983

Grant, 1978

SW Grant, Havelock North: From Village to Borough 1860-1952, Central Hawkes Bay Printers/Publishers 1978

Grant, 1980

SW Grant, In Other Days: A History of the Chambers Family of Te Mata, Havelock North, Hawkes Bay Newspapers Limited, 1980

New Zealand Architect

New Zealand Architect

Cochran C. Heritage Column, No 3 1985

Hill, 1976

M Hill, New Zealand Architecture, NZ Architectural School Publications 1976

Herald Tribune

Herald Tribune

'Its a new era for Arden', Wednesday April 16 1986

'Wide Interest in Arden Lodge Sale', Herald Tribune 27 October 1987

Other Information

A copy of this report is available from the NZHPT Central region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.