Spinks Cottage

129 Dixon Street, Wellington

  • Spinks Cottage.
    Copyright: NZ Historic Places Trust. Taken By: Anika Klee. Date: 9/02/2009.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 1 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 4704 Date Entered 25th September 1986

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City/District Council

Wellington City

Region

Wellington Region

Legal description

Pt Lot 1 DP 72762 - Spinks Cottage

Summaryopen/close

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The cottage was built for William Spinks, an early Wellington storekeeper, and from 1862 the first Wharfinger (Wharf Manager) of Queen's Wharf. The cottage has strong links with the early history of education in Wellington. For many years part of the house was used by Mr Spinks daughter as a school for young ladies. The school closed in 1879 and in 1884 the cottage was bought by St John's Presbyterian Church. The cottage had been

owned by the church for 102 years.

Typical, though large, cottage of the 1860s rare in Wellington now and in remarkable original condition. One of the oldest surviving examples of early domestic architecture in the city.

Spinks Cottage forms an integral part of a precinct of historic wooden buildings with the church and church hall.

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

The cottage was built for William Spinks, an early Wellington storekeeper, and from 1862 the first Wharfinger (Wharf Manager) of Queen's Wharf. The cottage has strong links with the early history of education in Wellington. For many years part of the house was used by Mr Spinks daughter as a school for young ladies. The school closed in 1879 and in 1884 the cottage was bought by St John's Presbyterian Church. The cottage had been owned by the church for 102 years.

ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE

Typical, though large, cottage of the 1860s rare in Wellington now and in remarkable original condition. One of the oldest surviving examples of early domestic architecture in the city. Construction methods are of interest.

SPECIAL FEATURES

Has original windows. The large ones are unusual by being four panes wide by four deep. Finials, finely moulded beadings and a tight staircase leading to four heavily coved bedrooms are other features.

TOWNSCAPE/LANDSCAPE SIGNIFICANCE

Forms an integral part of a precinct of historic wooden buildings with the church and church hall.

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Additional informationopen/close

Physical Description

Architectural Description (Style):

Two-storey building with steep pitched gable roofs, dormer windows, finials and multi-paned sash windows.

Modifications:

Interior recently restored by owners and verandah added to exterior following style of original one.

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1863 -

Construction Details

Weatherboard pit-sawn, with corrugated iron roof.

Other Information

A fully referenced registration report is available from the NZHPT Central region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.