Moana Railway Station

Midland Line, Moana

  • Moana Railway Station. Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Shellie Evans – flyingkiwigirl. Taken By: Shellie Evans – flyingkiwigirl. Date: 22/04/2015.
  • Moana Railway Station. Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Walgert (Flickr). Taken By: Walgert (Flickr). Date: 21/07/2008.
  • Moana Railway Station. Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Shellie Evans – flyingkiwigirl. Taken By: Shellie Evans – flyingkiwigirl. Date: 22/04/2015.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 1 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 5004 Date Entered 28th June 1990

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

Extent of registration includes part of the land described as Sec 1 SO 392560 (CT 432912; NZ Gazette 2008 p. 2523), Westland Land District, and the building known as Moana Railway Station thereon.

City/District Council

Grey District

Region

West Coast Region

Legal description

Sec 1 SO 392560 (CT 432912; NZ Gazette 2008 p. 2523), Westland Land District

Location description

The Moana Railway Station is located on the Midland Line which is adjacent to Ana Street, MOANA

Summaryopen/close

This text is from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The Moana Railway Station was built to serve the Stillwater to Otira section of the Midland Railway Line which was opened in 1894. In 1905 the station was enlarged to include a postal lobby. Lake Brunner became a popular destination for picnic trains. The demand for refreshments at the station resulted in the erection of tea rooms between the station and overbridge in 1911. Fifteen years later, on 15 April 1926, the railway station and refreshment rooms were burnt to the ground by a fire which started in the women's waiting room. A temporary railways hut was used at Moana until a new station could be erected but the Railways Department decided not to rebuild the tearooms at this time. The present station, which is similar to but slightly larger than that which burnt down, was built under the supervision of John Mahoney, foreman of works for the West Coast, and completed by 31 July 1926 at a cost of approximately eight hundred pounds. For many years the Moana Station was notable for the quality of the station gardens maintained by the Staff.

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

The Moana Station was the main crossing station for trains on the Midland line and the only staffed one on the Stillwater to Otira line and as such its staff were responsible for the operation of the nearby milling stations at Kotuku, Ruru and Te Kinga. Moana was also important for the 'picnic' trains bringing people to Lake Brunner.

ARCHITECTURAL QUALITY:

The Type A stations were the smallest of the standard designs for staffed stations updated by George Troup in 1904 in his capacity as Office and Designing Engineer of the Railways Department. Type A once accounted for about fifteen per cent of all railway stations in New Zealand. Standardisation of design allowed the Railways Department to economise on the construction of railway stations. Troup's revised designs were slightly more decorative and used more substantial door and window joinery than those erected before 1900. Standard design railway stations and their direct variations once accounted for over eighty per cent of all station buildings in the country, but Moana Railway Station is the only type A which is still extant in New Zealand with its associated sidings and goods sheds. It is important as representing Type A Stations, a significant group of standard design stations in New Zealand.

TOWNSCAPE/LANDMARK VALUE:

The railway station at Moana is a modest structure which stands in a picturesque environment and makes an important contribution to the townscape of Moana, particularly because its immediate railway environment has been preserved.

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Construction Professionalsopen/close

Troup, George Alexander

G A Troup (1863-1941) was born in London in 1863 and educated in Scotland. He trained as an architect and engineer under C E Calvert of Edinburgh and came to New Zealand in 1884. After a short time with the Survey Department in Otago he became a draughtsman for New Zealand Railways in Dunedin and then, from 1888, in Wellington. Troup became Chief Draughtsman in 1894. He designed many station buildings throughout the county, some of which are still in use today; these buildings form an important part of New Zealand's landscape. His best known building is the Dunedin Railway Station (1904-07). He also designed the head office building in Wellington for Railways (1901, now demolished).

Troup became a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1907. After World War I he was promoted to head the newly established Architectural Branch of New Zealand Railways. On retirement from Railways in 1925 he entered local body politics and was Mayor of Wellington from 1927 to 1931. Troup was prominent in the Presbyterian Church and founded the Presbyterian Young Men's Bible Class Union. He was an elder of the church for 47 years and also served on the governing bodies of several Wellington secondary schools. Education was a life-long interest and he was keenly involved in the training of engineering cadets in New Zealand Railways. Troup was knighted in 1937 and died in 1941.

Last updated 1 October 2014

Additional informationopen/close

Physical Description

ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION:

The station is built to the standard type A design, consisting of office, lobby, women's waiting room and women's toilet. As built, the main entry was from the platform through a pair of double doors. These doors have a fanlight and are flanked by narrow sash windows. This association of double doors and windows was a typical Troup station architectural feature. Internal doors link the other rooms. All rooms have horizontal tongue and groove lining. At the west end is a postal lobby with separate entrance from the platform. The office has a fireplace built of tapestry bricks with an external chimney breast. There is a ticket window into the lobby, and a service hatch into the postal lobby. Moana Station is built as the mirror image of a standard A design. This was presumably to ensure that visitors using the overbridge would arrive at the post office first and the toilets last! The office and lobby have windows in the back wall to provide fine lake views. At some time the women's waiting room has been connected to a lobby open to the platform.

The verandah which shelters the station platform is supported by six railway irons which are bolted to the front of the station building and bend out to meet the verandah eaves. The ends of the verandah are fitted with vertical valances which have been cut so as to form a scalloped edge which is the only decorative feature of the building. Approximately one hundred metres west of the station is a pedestrian overbridge which is the only all wooden example of its kind left in New Zealand.

MODIFICATIONS:

1958 - Platform front renewed in concrete and platform shortened to 78 metres.

Date Unknown - Front section of verandah removed to accommodate modern railway loads.

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1926 -

Modification
1958 -
Platform front renewed in concrete and platform shortened to 78 metres.

Modification
-
Front section of verandah removed to accommodate modern railway loads.

Construction Details

Rusticated weatherboards. Corrugated iron roof. Railway irons support the verandah roof.

Information Sources

Archives New Zealand (Chch)

Archives New Zealand (Christchurch)

Files: 236 & 2201, Accession CH9 NZR

Mahoney, 1987

J. D. Mahoney, Down at the Station: A Study of the New Zealand Railway Station, Palmerston North, 1987

Troup, 1982

G. Troup, George Troup: Architect and Engineer, Palmerston North, 1982

University of Canterbury

University of Canterbury

New Zealand Architects file, School of Fine Arts Reference Room

West Coast Scrapbook

West Coast Scrapbook

comp. by J.D. Mahoney, Christchurch

Other Information

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.