St Paul's Church (Anglican)

28 Symonds Street, Auckland

  • St Paul's Church (Anglican).
    Copyright: www.dayout.co.nz. Taken By: Alan Wylde.
  • St Paul's Church (Anglican). Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Nick Thompson. Taken By: Nick Thompson. Date: 24/07/2010.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Registered List Entry Type Historic Place Category 1
List Number 650 Date Entered 16th November 1989

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

Extent includes the land described as Pt Allot 8 Sec 15 Suburbs of Auckland (CT NA65/223), North Auckland Land District, and the building and structures known as St Paul’s Church (Anglican) thereon.

City/District Council

Auckland Council (Auckland City Council)

Region

Auckland Region

Legal description

Pt Allot 8 Sec 15 Suburbs of Auckland (CT NA65/223), North Auckland Land District

Summaryopen/close

St Paul's, Symonds Street, is the third building occupied by the parish. It is known as the 'Mother Church' of Auckland as the first St Paul's was also the first church built in the city. The foundation stone was laid by Governor Hobson on 28 July 1841 and the first service was held on 7 May 1843. In 1884 a temporary wooden building was erected to the design of William Skinner, on the site of the first church. This site was still considered for the replacement, permanent church but in the end the more central location of the Symonds Street, Wynyard Street intersection was chosen. William Skinner's plans were accepted but it was decided to leave the church unfinished at a lower cost.

The foundation stone, from the first St Paul's, was relaid for the new church on 11 June 1894 and the building was consecrated the following year. The fine carving of the capitals and label stops was completed by William Feldon in 1910-11.

The foundation stone for the permanent chancel was laid on 11 April 1915 but the addition did not proceed until 1936. It was dedicated on 29 October that year. In 1945 the vestry briefly considered completing the church tower and spire as a war memorial.

The church features some interesting internal decoration and fittings including Bishop Selwyn's throne, communion patten and chalice presented to him by Queen Victoria. Set into the walls in the south west corner are carved stones from Westminster Abbey, Canterbury Cathedral, Yorkminster and St Paul's Cathedral.

Assessment criteriaopen/close

As the church of Auckland city's oldest parish St Paul's is of considerable historic importance. With its central location and historic connections with the first St Paul's and the developing city this church and its predecessors have been a prominent feature of Auckland life since 1841. The present, curious, unfinished structure has in its own right been a prominent landmark in Auckland for nearly 100 years.

ARCHITECTURAL QUALITY:

Although it has never been completed St Paul's is nevertheless a particularly fine example of Gothic Revival architecture. The architects handling of the proportions and detailing was both skilful and elegant. St Paul's invites comparison with Sir Gilbert Scott's only New Zealand work, Christchurch Cathedral, c.1863. St Paul's makes a valuable contribution to the townscape in this area of Auckland.

TOWNSCAPE/LANDMARK VALUE:

Now unencumbered by surrounding contemporary buildings, St Paul's, with the polychromatic treatment of its stonework, visually dominates the Symonds Street, Wellesley Street intersection.

Linksopen/close

Construction Professionalsopen/close

Feldon, William Henry

Feldon (1872-1945) served a five year apprenticeship in sculpting with J H Arnett at Oxford. He then worked for Farmer and Brindley in London. He was a visiting Master to the College at Eastbourne where he taught carving and modelling, while also teaching many apprentices at Oxford.

Feldon came to New Zealand in 1910. He undertook a series of panels for Government House in Wellington. Following World War 1, Feldon won competitions for the design of war memorials at Bombay, Pokeno and Rotorua. He was responsible for many statues during his life inxluding the Arawa Memorial at the Rotorua Government Gardens Historic Area and the Matakana War Memorial statue of George V.

Skinner, William Henry

Skinner (1838-1915) grew up in England, the son of a builder. A student in the Department of Science and Art at South Kensington, he was awarded a bronze medal for success in art in 1859. He came to New Zealand that same year, working as a contractor and builder in Auckland. He remained in Auckland and practised as an architect from 1880 until his death in 1915.

His buildings include the "Star" Printing Office; the Onehunga Woollen Mills, the Freemason's Hall and the Grand Hotel, Princes Street. His ecclesiastical buildings include St Paul's Anglican Church, Symonds Street (1894-95), St James Presbyterian Church, Thames, and the Holy Sepulchre Church Hall, Khyber Pass. The latter was built as a temporary church for St Paul's parish and was later relocated.

William Skinner

William Henry Skinner (1838-1915), the son of a builder, was born in Newport, Wales. He studied in the Department of Science and Art at South Kensington, and was awarded a bronze medal for 'success in art' in 1859. Skinner came to New Zealand that same year, subsequently working as a contractor and builder in Auckland. In this capacity he erected a parsonage associated with the earlier Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Symonds Street in 1869. After enlisting in the Royal Rifle Volunteers during the New Zealand Wars, he rose to the rank of major. He remained in Auckland and practised as an architect from 1880 until his death in 1915.

Skinner's designs as an architect included the 'Star' printing office (demolished); the Onehunga Woollen Works; and the Freemasons' Hall (now a façade) on Princes Street, Auckland. His ecclesiastical buildings included the St James Presbyterian Church, Thames; St Paul's Anglican Church, Symonds Street, Auckland (1894-1895); and the temporary St Paul's Church, Eden Crescent, Auckland (1885) which is now part of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre complex on Khyber Pass Road.

Additional informationopen/close

Notable Features

Bishop Selwyn's throne, communion patten and chalice

The stones from English cathedrals

The foundation stone of the original church

Construction Details

Auckland basalt; Oamaru limestone dressings; walls, buttressed; roof, hammerbeam trusses; tiled roof originally Welsh slate. 1936 addition, reinforced concrete and brickwork, plastered internally (painted) and externally (unpainted). Pressed metal roofing tiles.

Cyclopedia of New Zealand, 1902

Cyclopedia Company, Industrial, descriptive, historical, biographical facts, figures, illustrations, Wellington, N.Z, 1897-1908, Vol.2, Christchurch, 1902

Dixon, 1978

Roger Dixon & Stefan Muthesius, 'Victorian Architecture', London, 1978

Hayward, 1987

Bruce W. Hayward, 'Granite and Marble: a guide to building stones in New Zealand', Geological Society of New Zealand Guidebook, No.8

Porter, 1979

Frances Porter (ed.), Historic Buildings of New Zealand: North Island, Auckland, 1979

Fleming, 1980

John Fleming, Hugh Honour and N. Pevsner, Dictionary of Architecture, London, 1980

The Penguin Dictionary of Architecture, Third Edition, Harmondsworth 1980

Clark, 1962

K. Clark, The Gothic Revival, Great Britain, 1962

Fletcher, 1948

B. Fletcher, A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method, London 1948

Stamp, 1980

G Stamp & C Amery, Victorian Buildings of London 1837 - 1887; An illustrated Guide, London 1980.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1980. This report includes the text from the original Building Classification Committee report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.