Rowandale

894 Okains Bay Road, Okains Bay

  • Rowandale, Okains Bay.
    Copyright: www.rowandalehomstead.co.nz.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 7283 Date Entered 14th December 1995

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

Extent includes part of the land described as Lot 1 DP 10807 (CT CB448/77), RS 9457 (CT CB21K/1227), Canterbury Land District and the building known as Rowandale thereon. Refer to the extent map tabled at the Rārangi Kōrero meeting on 8 June 2017.

City/District Council

Christchurch City

Region

Canterbury Region

Legal description

Lot 1 DP 10807 (CT CB448/77), RS 9457 (CT CB21K/1227), Canterbury Land District

Assessment criteriaopen/close

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Aesthetic:

The design of Rowandale presents a clear and competent interpretation of the principles of the English Edwardian Domestic Freestyle Revival.

Architectural:

The design of Rowandale is a well resolved essay in the Edwardian Tudor Revival style, incorporating Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts features characteristic of the period 1890-1914 in its construction.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Cultural:

Rowandale reflects the lifestyle enjoyed by members of the landed elite in Canterbury in the early part of the twentieth century.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The following comments are made in relation to the criteria identified under S.23(2) of the Historic Places Act 1993.

b) The association of the place with events, persons, or ideas of importance in New Zealand history:

The Thacker connection with O'Kains Bay dates back to September 1856. According to Ogilvie, John Edward Thacker and his wife Essy arrived in Canterbury in 1850, their daughter Elizabeth Agnes becoming "the first of the Pilgrim Children to be born after the arrival of the First Four Ships."

He retired form Christchurch in 1856 after a colourful career as a timber merchant, ship-owner and briefly, as a newspaper proprietor. he purchased a 24 hectare property in January 1857 and prospered so much that his holdings eventually increased to 3,038 hectares. His sawmilling operations resumed there, and he opened a steam saw mill in 1872, also purchasing coastal vessels to support the trade. He won several government contracts and imported timber from Australia and shipped his own from O'Kains Bay around New Zealand. He owned the bay's only hotel, served on the Road Board and was famous for engaging in litigation.

John Robert was one of ten children and it is from him that the present generation of Thackers are descended. He married Rosa Mason in 1900, having taken over the estate in 1888. Thacker, either individually or in consort with other family members, also acquired other properties in neighbouring bays such as Duvauchelle.

g) The technical accomplishment or value, or design of the place:

Rowandale was designed in the Art Nouveau style produced during the Edwardian Free Style period in domestic architecture which lasted from c.1890-c.1914.

Rowandale possesses many of the characteristic features of the Edwardian Free Style including the large sweeping roof and half timbering on the first floor. The timber is used in combination with a brick infill on the first floor with brick walls on the ground floor. It also features characteristic Free Style timber attachments in the form of balconies and shingles in the gable ends, verandahs; an oriel window, an Art Nouveau side wall window, bay windows, a large country house floor plan including a laundry and coal house attachment, metal casement windows with diamond pattern leadlight design in timber frames; a terracotta tile roof, a dormer window and exposed rafters under wide overhanging eaves.

This house is a rare survivor of the architect's, Cecil Wood, early period before the First World War and its uniqueness is enhanced by the fact it is a large country house design of high quality. The exact date of construction is unknown. After his return from the War, Wood moved away from Domestic Revival and specialised in the neo-Georgian style for which he is best known.

Conclusion:

Rowandale, O'Kains Bay, Banks Peninsula, is recommended for registration as a Category II as a place of historical and cultural heritage significance and value. Rowandale is of historic significance as the homestead of J.R. Thacker, a member of a family that has played a major role in the affairs of O'Kains Bay since 1856. It was designed by prominent Christchurch architect Cecil Wood and is a rare example of his earlier work in the Edwardian Free Style.

Linksopen/close

Construction Professionalsopen/close

Wood, Cecil Walter

Born in Christchurch, Wood (1878-1947) was articled to the local architect Frederick Strouts between 1894 and 1899. He worked for a short time as a draughtsman with the firm Clarkson and Ballantyne before travelling to England in 1901. Here Wood was exposed to a high quality of architectural design in the Edwardian Free Style, and was employed by two leading Edwardian architects Robert Weir Shultz and Leonard Stokes.

In 1907 Wood returned to New Zealand to take up partnership with Samuel Hurst Seager. The partnership lasted for only one year for Wood set up his own practice in 1908. The years 1908-1915 were dominated by domestic commissions, but it was also during this time that he began his association with Christ's College, which included such commissions as Hare Memorial Library (1915), the Memorial Dining Hall (1923-5), Jacob's House (1931) and Open Air Classrooms (1932). During the 1920s Wood's practice began to expand and a Georgian influence can be seen in such works as Weston House Park Terrace (1923-4) and Bishopscourt (1926-7).

A short lived partnership in 1927 with R S D Harman allowed Wood to travel to the United States while another in 1937 with Paul Pascoe allowed him to travel to England, Europe and the United States without neglecting his practice. During this second trip he made preparations for the design of St Paul's Anglican Cathedral in Wellington, which was erected after his death.

During his life Wood had made a substantial contribution to the architecture of Christchurch, having an enthusiasm for both European and American styles.

Additional informationopen/close

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1910 -

Information Sources

New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT)

New Zealand Historic Places Trust

Nomination Form

Ogilvie, 1990

G. Ogilvie, Banks Peninsula; the Cradle of Canterbury, GP Books, 1990

Other Information

A copy of the original report is available from the NZHPT Southern region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.