St Paul's Church

Kimbolton Street, Cheltenham

  • Watercolour of St Paul's Church.
    Copyright: Photograph © Don Donovan. Taken By: Don Donovan.
  • .
    Copyright: Photograph © Don Donovan. Taken By: Don Donovan.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 7284 Date Entered 14th December 1995

Locationopen/close

City/District Council

Manawatu District

Region

Horizons (Manawatu-Wanganui) Region

Legal description

Lot 2 Blk III DP 134 Blk VII, Oroua Survey District

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Historical/Social:

St Paul's Church, Cheltenham, is of local significance as an Anglican church serving a comparatively late-settled European rural community

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Aesthetic:

St Paul's, a small box-like church with a steeply-pitched gabled roof of corrugated iron, stands on the crest of a hill in Cheltenham. The church can be seen from up to two kilometres away on the approaching roads; such buildings and their settings form a familiar sight in the New Zealand rural scene.

Architectural:

This small wooden church was designed by the architect Frederick Jersey de Clere (1856-1952) and was built in 1904. It has many of the stylistic features associated with Victorian Carpenter Gothic. The design and planning are plain and the building is clad in rusticated weatherboards. Other features include the exposed timber framework, plain barge boards, and a board-and-batten cladding on the gable infills; there are ventilator louvres in east and west gables, and a louvred and gabled belfry. The windows are paired shallow trefoil windows in a cruciform frame. Two stained glass windows at the eastern end of the church are dedicated to Henry and Mary Burnell.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Spiritual:

This well preserved church as been a focus of Anglicanism in the Cheltenham area for over 90 years.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The following comments are made in relation to the criteria identified under S.23(2) of the Historic Places Act 1993.

b) The association of the place and events, persons or ideas of importance in New Zealand history:

This small rural church is representative of the history of institutionalised religion in New Zealand. The construction date is late by North Island standards, but would appear to be logical in view of the timeline for European development of this part of the country. The construction of the modest building and subsequent additions of the church hall and alterations to the belfry etc, reflect the growth in needs and resources within the parish.

The architect, Frederick Jersey de Clere, was a figure of some importance within his industry.

c) The potential of the place to provide knowledge of New Zealand history:

St Paul's has a modest potential to provide knowledge of some aspects of local history. The church's commanding location, although now somewhat masked by trees and surrounding housing, gives it a landmark status within the community.

h) The symbolic or commemorative value of the place:

Two stained glass windows at the eastern end of the church are dedicated to Henry and Mary Burnell, early parishioners. There is a Great War memorial in the grounds; St Paul's was the first church in the district to have a war memorial.

Conclusion:

St Paul's Church, Cheltenham, is recommended for registration as a Category II as a place of historical and cultural heritage significance and value. St Paul's is representative of small North Island churches built early this century and has aesthetic appeal due to both its design by the architect, Frederick Jersey de Clere, and its commanding location.

Linksopen/close

Construction Professionalsopen/close

Clere, Frederick De Jersey

Clere (1856-1952) was born in Lancashire, the son of an Anglican clergyman, and was articled to Edmund Scott, an ecclesiastical architect of Brighton. He then became chief assistant to R J Withers, a London architect. Clere came to New Zealand in 1877, practising first in Feilding and then in Wanganui. He later came to Wellington and practised there for 58 years.

He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1886 and held office for 50 years as one of four honorary secretaries in the Empire. In 1883 he was appointed Diocesan Architect of the Anglican Church; he designed more than 100 churches while he held this position. Clere was a pioneer in reinforced concrete construction; the outstanding example of his work with this material is the Church of St Mary of the Angels (1922), Wellington.

As well as being pre-eminent in church design, Clere was responsible for many domestic and commercial buildings including Wellington's Harbour Board Offices and Bond Store (1891) and Overton in Marton. Clere was also involved in the design of large woolsheds in Hawkes Bay and Wairarapa.

He was active in the formation of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and served on their council for many years. He was a member of the Wellington City Council until 1895, and from 1900 a member of the Wellington Diocesan Synod and the General Synod. He was also a member of the New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts.

Additional informationopen/close

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1904 -

Information Sources

New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT)

New Zealand Historic Places Trust

Nomination Form

Mayo, 1954

J F Mayo, The First Fifty Years: the Story of St Paul's, Cheltenham , 1954

Other Information

A copy of the original report is available from the NZHPT Central region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.