Monavale Homestead

Te Awamutu Road, R D 3, Cambridge

  • Monavale Homestead.
    Copyright: NZ Historic Places Trust.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 7328 Date Entered 6th September 1996

Locationopen/close

City/District Council

Waipa District

Region

Waikato Region

Legal description

part of Lot 1 DP S.41840 pt Allotments 99, 100, 105 & 105A, Parish of Pukekura

Assessment criteriaopen/close

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Classification report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Aesthetic:

The aesthetic appeal of Monavale lies in its well integrated house and garden setting, with its long driveway lined with Canadian Oaks, its rose garden, and its collection of imported English trees.

Architectural:

Monavale is a capacious, late-Edwardian homestead built of Kauri in something of a transitional style. The exterior is largely unmodified, with dominant gables running to two and a half stories, and an impressive verandah supported by attractive grouped posts running along three sides of the building. There are elements here of the (Indian) bungalow, and a stripped Arts and Crafts aesthetic.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Classification report considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

g) The technical accomplishment or value, or design of the place:

Monavale was built in 1910. The main facade consists of a dominant symmetrical gabled block of 21/2 stories. A low-slung, part-gabled verandah runs along three sides of the building. Overall, the style of the house is transitional, with elements of the villa blended with features derived from the Indian bungalow. The soaring gables, shingled in their apexes, bring to mind the vernacular emphasis of the Arts and Crafts movement, as do the small, fenestrated and shingled gables at either end of the front verandah. The architect was Arthur Herrold (1874-1943).

Conclusion

Monavale Homestead is recommended for registration as a Category II place of historical and cultural heritage significance and value. This pleasant and commodious Edwardian farmhouse has been designed out of various influences (Indian Bungalow, Arts and Crafts) into a symmetrical and balanced composition.

Linksopen/close

Construction Professionalsopen/close

Herrold , Arthur B (1874-1943)

Comparatively little is known about the early life of Arthur Bibra Herrold, although his family may have come from colonial Bengal. By 1908, Herrold was practicing architecture in Auckland, winning a competition for the design of Cambridge Town Hall (erected 1909). He also gained first prize in a competition for Parnell Library in 1909, although this was never built.

Subsequent structures for which Herrold was responsible included Monavale Homestead, Cambridge (1910), Warkworth Town Hall (1911), Taihape Town Hall (in conjunction with H.J. Doherty, 1912) and commercial premises of steel frame design in Queen Street, Auckland (1915). A keen bowls player, he also provided the plans for a Bowling Club Pavilion in Cambridge (1914) free of charge. Herrold appears to have been involved in several legal wrangles during his career, including a court case in 1916. He is believed to have left New Zealand approximately at this time, becoming a sugar plantation owner in Ba, Fiji.

Additional informationopen/close

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1910 -

Information Sources

Salmond, 1986

Jeremy Salmond, Old New Zealand Houses 1800-1940, Auckland, 1986, Reed Methuen

Other Information

A copy of the original report is available from the NZHPT Northern region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.