Mataura Railway Station (Former)

Main Street, Mataura

  • Mataura Railway Station (Former). Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: rustyalishere (Alan Ritchie Gore). Taken By: rustyalishere (Alan Ritchie Gore). Date: 20/10/2010.
  • Mataura Railway Station (Former).
    Copyright: NZ Historic Places Trust. Taken By: Owen Graham. Date: 20/03/2012.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Place Category 2 Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 7345 Date Entered 25th October 1996

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

Extent includes part of the land described as Sec 1 and Pt Sec 2 Blk IV Town of Mataura (NZ Gazette 1882, p.1073), Southland Land District, and the building known as the Mataura Railway Station (Former) thereon, and its fittings and fixtures.

City/District Council

Gore District

Region

Southland Region

Legal description

Sec 1 and Pt Sec 2 Blk IV Town of Mataura (NZ Gazette 1882, p.1073), Southland Land District

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The South Island main trunk line reached Mataura in 1875 with the first railway station being built approximately five years later. That building was destroyed by fire on 20 May 1920 and quickly replaced by the present structure, which was finished in March 1921. The presence of the railway has long been critical to the prosperity of the heavily industrialised small town of Mataura.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

Architectural:

The Mataura Railway Station was designed by Railways architect, George Troup, in 1921. Many of the station building's original Arts and Crafts features have been preserved intact.

This historic place was registered under the Historic Places Act 1993. The following text is from the original Recommendation for Registration considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.

The following comments are made in relation to the criteria identified under S.23(2) of the Historic Places Act 1993.

a) The extent to which the place reflects important or representative aspects of New Zealand history:

The east coast of the South Island benefited from the creation of a substantial port and railway system during the 1870s and 1880s. The completion of the South Island main trunk spurred the development of inland towns such as Mataura, where first paper manufacturing and later meat freezing came to dominate the local economy. Today, the Mataura station remains one of Southland's freight stations. The station is significant in terms of the development of Mataura and is also has representative significance at a national level.

g) The technical accomplishment or value, or design of the place:

The Mataura Railway Station building has preserved intact the original features as designed by George Troup in 1921. These features include half-timbering battens, original brick chimneys, double-hung sash windows with Arts and Crafts coloured glass, slate roof with original cresting, and original platform with Troup's well-known scalloped edge valances on the ends of the platform canopy. These features have not been interfered with in any way.

The interior of the building is particularly original with few alterations. The interior includes a luggage room, parcels and tickets room, a vestibule (now general office), the ladies waiting room and a lavatory. Some interior features are T & G wall and ceiling linings; original cornices, skirtings and architraves; and the original fireplace in the ladies' waiting room which is still operational.

Conclusion:

The Mataura Railway Station, Mataura, Southland, is recommended for registration as a Category II as a place of historical and cultural heritage significance and value. The Railway Station building was designed by Railways architect, George Troup, in 1921. The building's still retains many of its original Arts and Crafts features and signifies the importance of the railways in this small industrial town.

Linksopen/close

Construction Professionalsopen/close

Troup, George Alexander

G A Troup (1863-1941) was born in London in 1863 and educated in Scotland. He trained as an architect and engineer under C E Calvert of Edinburgh and came to New Zealand in 1884. After a short time with the Survey Department in Otago he became a draughtsman for New Zealand Railways in Dunedin and then, from 1888, in Wellington. Troup became Chief Draughtsman in 1894. He designed many station buildings throughout the county, some of which are still in use today; these buildings form an important part of New Zealand's landscape. His best known building is the Dunedin Railway Station (1904-07). He also designed the head office building in Wellington for Railways (1901, now demolished).

Troup became a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1907. After World War I he was promoted to head the newly established Architectural Branch of New Zealand Railways. On retirement from Railways in 1925 he entered local body politics and was Mayor of Wellington from 1927 to 1931. Troup was prominent in the Presbyterian Church and founded the Presbyterian Young Men's Bible Class Union. He was an elder of the church for 47 years and also served on the governing bodies of several Wellington secondary schools. Education was a life-long interest and he was keenly involved in the training of engineering cadets in New Zealand Railways. Troup was knighted in 1937 and died in 1941.

Last updated 1 October 2014

Additional informationopen/close

Construction Dates

Original Construction
1921 -

Information Sources

Archives New Zealand (Auck)

Archives New Zealand (Auckland)

Rail Heritage Trust record form, 3 November 1992, Railnet Files

Other Information

A copy of the original report is available from the NZHPT Southern region office

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.