Queen Mary Hospital (Former) and Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Historic Area

Amuri Avenue And Jacks Pass Road, Hanmer Springs

  • Queen Mary Hospital (Former) and Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Historic Area. Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Shellie Evans . Taken By: Shellie Evans – flyingkiwigirl. Date: 15/07/2014.
  • Queen Mary Hospital (Former) and Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Historic Area. Soldiers Block western octagonal ward.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: Pam Wilson. Date: 1/03/2004.
  • Queen Mary Hospital (Former) and Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Historic Area. Gasometer constructed in 1899.
    Copyright: Heriatge New Zealand. Taken By: Pam Wilson. Date: 1/03/2004.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Area Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 7583 Date Entered 10th December 2004

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Extent of List Entry

The Historic Area comprises the northern portion of the former hospital site and thermal pools complex. The former hospital site contains four buildings of particular heritage significance: the Soldiers Block (1916), the Maintenance Office (1916), the Nurses Home (1926) and the Chisholm Ward (1926). Two former bath houses (Gymnasium [1929-30] and Fountain House [1943]) have had mixed uses and form part of the thermal pools complex [Gymnasium and Fountain House destroyed 2009]. Other notable structures include: the Gardeners Shed (c.1900); Maintenance Office (1916); Tea House (1904); Gasometer (1899); trees (with substantial plantings having occurred c.1890's being noted in 1914) and landscape within the Historic Area.

City/District Council

Hurunui District

Region

Canterbury Region

Legal description

Lot 2-3 DP 430432 (CT 518495), (NZ Gazette 2010, p 2643), Sec 77 Hanmer Town Area (CT CB21F/1490), (NZ Gazette 1990, p 4589), Lot 1 DP 426562 (CT 504568), (NZ Gazette 2010, p 2643), Reserve 4671, (NZ Gazette 1953, p 225), Lot 1 DP 63973 (CT CB38C/187), Canterbury Land District

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Area description:

The area included in the registration is the historic heart of the former Queen Mary Hospital and the thermal pools complex at Hanmer Springs. The Hanmer Springs settlement is located at the north-eastern edge of the Hanmer plains, is 370 metres above sea level and is framed to the north by gradually rising mountains which provide a picturesque background.

In 1860, 2,560 acres (1,072 hectares) of land encompassing the thermal pools complex was proclaimed a reserve by the Nelson Provincial Government. Facilities for visitors to the pools were added and upgraded regularly over the years and Queen Mary Hospital itself was established in 1916 within the reserve. The hospital buildings were initially grouped around the thermal pools area and extended beyond this within the original reserve to include a working farm.

Two street frontages, Amuri Avenue and Jack's Pass Road, bound the proposed area to the east and north. On the west, a stream forms the boundary, and the southern boundary runs five metres south of the Soldiers Block. It extends across from the Amuri Avenue frontage to the western stream, running behind the Soldier's Block, across to include the Maintenance Office and the Nurses' Home with the southerly framing trees, and then turns to meet the stream.

The boundaries for the proposed historic area were drawn to include those buildings which effectively encapsulate the history of the thermal pools, the Queen Mary Hospital and their park environs. The southern boundary has been altered slightly. Originally the boundary for the Hurunui Council's proposed zoning change for the area was used, because it aligned very closely to the NZHPT's objectives to recognise the heritage values of the place. Council proposes to zone the northern part of the Queen Mary site as an area of high amenity, with the southern section to be available for business and residential development. Submissions have indicated that using a "proposed" zoning division which may not come into effect is inappropriate, so a new boundary has been drawn to more specifically enclose the area, including the identified heritage features and providing sufficient buffer space beside the buildings.

A map showing the boundaries of the proposed historic area is in Appendix 2.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA:

Hanmer Springs' township is sited on the edge of a plateau area, adjacent to the foothills which rise to the Southern Alps. It altitude is 385 metres and it enjoys an alpine climate. The thermal pools are close to the rising hills but on fairly level ground which slopes gradually to the south.

The land on which the Queen Mary Hospital was established alongside the pools has some minor undulations with a more noticeable dip behind the Rutherford Ward, where a minor water way defines the edge of the hospital site (outside the proposed historic area). On the western boundary a more substantial stream separates hospital land from the golf course.

Buildings are located throughout the site so that each of the main hospital blocks is in a spacious setting with green surroundings. All are enhanced by the surrounding trees and views to the mountains.

CURRENT PHYSICAL CONDITION:

Lack of use is not good for any of the buildings in ownership by the Canterbury District Health Board, though they were well maintained when their care was the Board's responsibility. It will be beneficial if the future of the site can be decided soon. The condition of the Soldiers Ward, Chisholm Ward and the Nurses' Home is reasonable. The condition of the other buildings varies with the most concern over the two bath and massage blocks because of the presence of asbestos.

On the pools site the Tea House was recently restored and the Gasometer was stabilised in 1992.

Since the hospital closed, a reduced regime of gardening care has been followed but it has been sufficient to maintain the property in fair condition with lawns mowed and the garden plots attended to.

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

The Hanmer Springs have historical significance because of their status as a Spa in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Like the thermal Springs at Rotorua and Te Aroha, they were promoted by the government as tourist attractions because of their scenic qualities as well as the medicinal benefits of bathing in, or ingesting the water.

The thermal pools at Hanmer Springs were officially opened as a government spa in 1883, with the sanatorium constructed in 1897. The surviving Tea House, 1904, is of historic importance as the only surviving example of this design created for the three government Spas (see details re Tea House in next section) where the original use has continued.

The historic values of the Hanmer Springs' thermal pools increased when the Defence Department decided in 1916 that this was the place to build the especially designed Queen Mary hospital for the treatment of sick and wounded soldiers. Successes here soon gained this hospital recognition as a particularly effective treatment centre. The emphasis on the treatment of nervous disorders which developed under military jurisdiction, continued when the Health Department took control and the hospital was used for both male and female public patients. As the hospital expanded, so did its reputation for the quality of its treatment, with patients coming here from throughout New Zealand.

Of the three spa areas only Hanmer Springs and Rotorua were associated with these special World War I hospitals and only at Hanmer Springs did the facility continue and develop as a public mental hospital until 2003. Unlike other mental health facilities throughout New Zealand, the Queen Mary Hospital evolved from the specially designed Soldiers Block in 1916 with its close links to the Hanmer Springs thermal pools and the identified therapeutic benefits of the elevated scenic setting. No other mental institution functioned for over 50 years in conjunction with spa facilities. That the therapeutic benefits of the thermal pools were seen as an important feature of many treatments is evidenced by the various health authorities retaining ownership of the pools complex until 1978. The importance of the environs has also been cited as another differentiating feature. In 1917 the Surgeon General reported to the Minister for Health, 'I am now confident that the climate and the surrounding of Hanmer are particularly suitable for shell-shock and neurasthenia cases. They certainly do better there than at Rotorua' .

At the time of the hospital's closure after 30 years of successful treatment of alcoholics, John Beattie, co-owner of the private clinic said ':...no one can take away that this is the best treatment team in New Zealand....the basic entity is the best, because they've been put to the test the longest, at the toughest end of the spectrum' . All these aspects have given the former Queen Mary Hospital and the associated thermal pools status of unique historic value in New Zealand.

Through the years the treatment here has been considered particularly successful because of the built as well as the physical environment

A majority of the buildings within this area have considerable architectural significance. The Soldiers Block, 1916, was the first building for the Queen Mary Hospital, and it is the only intact example of this special design for a military hospital that was used during World War I in New Zealand. It was planned to maximise access for patients to fresh air and sunshine, considered of supreme importance for shell-shocked soldiers as it was for tuberculosis sufferers. Each of the two octagonal shaped wards was surrounded by unglazed openings (which could be covered with hessian) and there was a lantern in each roof over the raised central nurses' station.

The Chisholm Ward, 1926, built ten years later to accommodate women patients, shows a progression in hospital design and was intended to provide a practical, functional facility that was attractive and homely in appearance as well as continuing the focus on access to fresh air and sunshine. While the Soldiers Block is unique the Chisholm Ward is not dissimilar to those found among other hospital complexes. Its domestic rather than institutional character reflects changing attitudes and current trends in Arts and Crafts architecture with its "butterfly" plan of angled wings extending from the central core. This was also used at the Wellington Hospital's Fever Ward, designed 1911, built 1918, and registered Category II. The architectural character of the Wellington example relates more to contemporary English Arts and Crafts precedents and has some hints of the Queen Anne style. The Queen Mary Hospital, built nearly a decade later, is larger and has endured in it original use for longer with minimal changes. It has features characteristic of the bungalow with the long low proportions, casement and bay windows and the extensive balcony with repeated arch form. From the time of its opening it has been considered a practical as well as an aesthetically pleasing design.

The layout and quality of the Nurses' Home reflects the contemporary desire to provide good accommodation for working nurses so that they had both a "homely atmosphere" with privacy to sleep or study, communal living spaces to associate with their fellow nurses and appropriate facilities, while being ideally located between the two wards of the hospital, in a setting that allowed staff to be "away from work". It was designed by government architects and while not of outstanding architectural quality when compared with other similarly dated buildings (Porirua Nurses' Home or Wigram Officers' Mess) it makes a considerable impact as a visual link between the two hospital buildings as well as contributing to the total heritage landscape and is an important representative example of the very necessary accommodation blocks provided for nurses in this era.

The Tea House also has special architectural qualities as a government designed Edwardian-styled pavilion. The alterations that have been made to accommodate the present usage have not detracted from its original character. Two other examples of this tea house design remain at early government resorts, though none still function as tea houses.

This group of buildings set within the parkland established around the thermal pools, tell the history of the proposed historic area. They vary in their style and function and illustrate differing approaches to need, from the simple basic shed, to the unique requirements for the Soldiers Block and the refinements at the Chisholm Ward.

The Gasometer has considerable technological value in its size, construction and early date. It is the oldest surviving structure associated with the pools and enquiries to date in New Zealand and Australia indicate that this is a very rare example of a gasometer. There is no other known example of a structure of this small scale or early date.

There is great aesthetic value in the parkland environs of the hospital and the thermal pools with the mature trees and garden plots. The placement and design of the three large buildings contribute to the area's cultural landscape values. The planting of exotic trees began in 1883 when the government began the development of the area and includes many notable species and specimens. Located in the centre of Hanmer Springs, it provides an open space and visual amenity similar to what Hagley Park gives to Christchurch, though on a village scale.

Although there has never been a plan for a landscaped park, work by the various gardeners over the years has successfully created one and it has been seen since 1916 as a factor contributing to the healing process. When the Chisholm Ward was opened in 1926 The Press, in describing the qualities of the new building and it function explained, "An innovation is an area in the garden where patients fond of flowers will be encouraged to do some work amongst them". Patients continued to have opportunities to be involved in garden maintenance as the therapeutic values of such work was recognised. Denis Welch, having talked with those who had been helped and healed by their Hanmer experience refers to the place's "...unique qualities" the setting, the spiritual sustenance, the sense of healing and peace" .

The whole site, but especially that in the immediate vicinity of the pools, has archaeological significance because of the European activities here since the 1860s. No known Maori artefacts have been discovered during the continued changes and excavations that have been made in the vicinity of the thermal pools. (Note the assessment made by Nicolas Cable [OPUS archaeologist] for the Hurunui District Council in which he identifies the areas of archaeological significance where pipes and early foundations might remain and recommends to the Council that an archaeological protocol be established.)

The proposed Queen Mary Hospital (former) and Hanmer Springs Thermal Reserve Historic Area has cultural and social values through its association with the people who have received health benefits from their time here and have enjoyed the scenic attractions of the place. For many people Hanmer Springs has also been a family holiday destination for several generations, visiting the thermal pools and enjoying the general environs.

The hospital institution, since its beginnings, has had a special relationship and integration with the people living in the surrounding Hanmer Springs village. Patients have always been able to freely merge into village activities. This has been influential in making a stay at Queen Mary a more comfortable experience for patients as there was never the stigma attached as there was for other institutions catering for nervous disorders.

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Historical and associated iwi/hapu/whanau

Ngai Tahu

Historical Narrative

For centuries Ngai Tahu appreciated the thermal activity in this locality, which they named Mani Rauhea. (The Plain of the Shining Tussock.) The thermal springs were also known as Wahi Oranga, (the healing place) . The Maori legend of Tamatea, calling on the Ariki of the Northern volcanoes to save his party from freezing on their journey back to the North Island after their canoe was wrecked, gave rise to the hot springs being known as Te Whakatakaka O Te Ngarehu O Ahi Tamatea, (where the ashes of Tamateas' fire lay) .

The hot springs were close to the route used by early European settlers journeying from Nelson and Marlborough through to Canterbury. In 1859 attention was drawn to this special natural feature after they were "discovered" by William Jones and in 1860 the Nelson Provincial Government, recognizing their significance, created a reserve of some 2,560 acres (1,072 hectares) around the springs. In 1876 when provincial governments were abolished, the area became part of Canterbury. Increasingly, passers by enjoyed the benefits of a dip in the natural pools and in 1878 Mr. John Fry, who operated the nearby Jolies Pass Hotel, erected a bathing shed beside the main spring. By 1883 William Rolleston, Minister of Lands, became interested in the site's potential and the Lands Department built the first baths. This date has been recognised as the beginning of Hanmer Springs as a Government Resort and as a nationally significant Spa .

With a caretaker appointed to oversee activities the area was fenced, a pool excavated and a bath house built as the first stage of what was to develop into a large complex. Access to this remote area of Canterbury was greatly improved by completion of the railway from Christchurch to Culverden in 1886 and the coach service connecting to Hanmer Springs being able to use the Waiau Ferry Bridge, constructed in 1887. As a result, each year the number of recorded visitors to the pools increased, with facilities and the environs being improved accordingly. However, accommodation was scarce for the numerous, often frail people who sought the benefits of "taking the waters", so the government endeavoured to encourage the provision of an hotel by private enterprise. By 1896 reports from Hanmer Springs pleaded for conveniently located accommodation to be built, and while explaining the pleasure healthy visitors derived from the swimming pool, considerable emphasis was given to the importance of the baths' curative values. It was considered that those with sciatica and rheumatism benefited greatly from their visits, while breathing Hanmer Springs' high mountain air and inhaling steam from the hottest pool satisfactorily eased chest problems .

By December 1897 the government had responded and the Sanatorium was opened adjacent to the Springs. It offered 1st and 2nd class accommodation for 16-18 people and though chiefly occupied by patients using the pools, it provided no medical support. (Coincidentally, a lease of land in the town centre had at last been taken up for a hotel and Robert Hood of the Jollies Pass Hotel constructed The Lodge, which opened in October 1897.) The environs of the government reserve had been enhanced by tree planting since 1883 with over three thousand trees and shrubs planted just in 1897. The scenic attractions of the area with its stunning mountain backdrop were now frequently mentioned as a feature.

Methane gas collected from the springs was initially used for lighting and to heat the baths' waiting room and then in 1898 a gas-holder capable of holding 1,800 cubic feet of gas was erected near the pools. This enabled the sanatorium to run more economically by using natural gas for heating, lighting and cooking. Self-sufficiency was desirable because of Hanmer Springs' distance from ready supplies, so hens and cows were kept, and the vegetable garden and orchard were carefully maintained.

The focus on the Springs up to this time was as a Spa where health could be improved and thus the new building was named the Sanatorium. Although this focus continued, the broader attractions of the area were also promoted. The remote and therefore peaceful location at the edge of the Hanmer Basin, attractive mountain backdrop, the gardens, landscaped environs and recreational facilities at the springs and the appealing climate were all qualities to attract tourists. When the Tourist Department was created in 1901, control of the government facilities at Hanmer Springs were transferred from Lands and Survey to this new department. They renamed the Sanatorium The Spa, and built a massage building, a Tea House and a cold water swimming pool at the Springs complex. Rethinking their approach to accommodation in 1908, The Spa's name reverted to The Sanatorium, with the building now staffed by nurses and a resident medical officer. It did not function fully as a hospital, but provided care for the often fragile visitors, hoping to improve their health through bathing in the pools, drinking the water or inhaling the steam. The department's expenses increased causing anxieties about the Sanatorium's financial viability when it was destroyed by fire in August, 1914, though care and accommodation was still provided at a house in the village. A replacement sanatorium was designed but never built. This effectively brought about the end of Hanmer Springs' role as a spa in the European sense .

A new phase began in 1916. The ownership of The Lodge, Hanmer Springs' public hotel, had been taken over in 1907 by local runholder Duncan Rutherford. In 1914 he offered the complex for use as a convalescent home for servicemen. He also established the Amuri Red Cross which provided the home with a matron, a housekeeper, cook, domestic staff and food supplies, while the government paid for a doctor, military officer and medical supplies. The rather awkward mix of volunteers working under military command functioned with remarkable unanimity for about two years during which 215 servicemen were cared for . A more formal arrangement soon followed when the government organised the construction of a specially designed hospital alongside the hot springs complex. The Queen Mary Hospital for Sick and Wounded Soldiers opened on 3rd June 1916. As at Rotorua, the thermal springs and associated facilities were taken over for the benefit of the returned servicemen and it was recognised that there were special healing qualities in the Hanmer Springs environment. The Queen Mary Hospital initially functioned as a convalescent home, but increasingly it specialised in the treatment of shell-shock, neurasthenia and other functional nervous diseases. Captain Chisholm was one of two doctors sent for further training at Maudsley Neurological Hospital in England in 1919, returning at the end of that year to take charge of the Queen Mary Hospital. By this date the hospital, sited alongside the pools complex, provided the patients with access to a park like environment offering leisure activities including golf and tennis - all elements which would assist the healing process.

The hospital remained under military control until 1921 when it was handed over to the Department of Health with Dr. Chisholm as the Medical Superintendent. The self sufficiency of earlier days continued with the farm providing milk for the hospital and most of the village. Although large numbers of servicemen continued to receive treatment here, there was an increasing number of civilian patients and more accommodation was required. At the same time members of the public continued visiting to bathe and ingest the waters in order that their various ailments might be healed. The hospital acquired property within the township to house staff and patients and in 1926 a large ward was built to house female patients. (By 1952 it was renamed the Chisholm Ward to honour the long serving Medical Superintendent.) The Nurses' Home, built in 1927, provided more suitable living conditions for the staff, now predominantly female. In 1940, because of demand, a new and larger male ward was needed to replace the Soldiers Block. (Note: this building is not included in the proposed historic area). Its construction was delayed and inhibited as materials and workmen were in short supply in the first years of the war, but it was finally put into use and named the Rutherford Ward to commemorate the early support given to the Queen Mary Hospital by Duncan Rutherford. Meantime, it had been decided that the original building be retained and upgraded to again care for returning servicemen and women.

Use of the baths was originally an important component of the hospital's treatment programmes, assisting in patients' rehabilitation. This lessened as direction turned more exclusively to the treatment of functional nervous disorders and from the 1940s to the detoxification of alcoholics. In the following decades Hanmer Springs' hospital was recognised as New Zealand's principal center for the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction. In 1972 the North Canterbury Hospital Board took control of the hospital; later the Canterbury Hospital Board, the Canterbury Area Health Board, Health Link South and then the Canterbury District Health Board. Over the period from the 1980s there were threats of closure and in 1997 the complex was leased to a private consortium (the Hanmer Clinic) which continued to operate as a drug rehabilitation clinic with the backing of government funding. When this was withdrawn in 2003 the Clinic went into liquidation and ceased operating. The Canterbury District Health Board has resolved to dispose of the property and its future is currently uncertain.

With responsibility for the pools from 1921, the Health Department endeavoured to promote the tourism attractions of Hanmer Springs, with a tendency now to emphasise the broader scenic attractions and leisure activities of the area rather than the curative values of "taking the waters". In 1929 and 1940 respectively, the old bathhouses were demolished and new ones built, along with new massage blocks. Males and females were still catered for in separate establishments at this time. Because the facilities under hospital jurisdiction were not developed as they might have been, Hanmer Springs' residents were envious of the amenities available to the general public at Rotorua. From 1978 the pools area's management was separated from the hospital and transferred to the Hurunui District Council, with patients from the hospital retaining access for some years. Under Council management the complex has been completely reorganized and landscaped through major programmes undertaken in 1992 and 1999. It currently includes a swimming pool, natural rock pools, a hydroslide and massage facilities. Still retained are the 1904 Tea House and the 1899 Gasometer, notable reminders of the thermal pools' beginnings.

This whole complex is unique. The Queen Mary Hospital evolved from a military controlled hospital for healing shell shocked soldiers and it was established in Hanmer Springs for the benefits to be derived from use of the thermal pools as well as the healing qualities of the environs. Its patients have always been integrated into the town's normal functioning, so that they had no sense of shame being here. A significant aspect of difference between the Queen Mary Hospital and similar institutions is the date of its formation in 1916. This has meant that it has never been dominated by a grand but forbidding 19th century edifice as at Sunnyside (1868) in Christchurch, Seacliff (1878) near Dunedin or Porirua (1887) near Wellington. It has never been associated with the colonial nomenclature "Lunatic Asylum" nor has it had patients with the type of illness that made them violent and requiring full strength security. All these factors have allowed the Queen Mary Hospital to display the identity the early Maori recognized, Wahi Oranga, the healing place.

Physical Description

Hanmer Springs' township is sited on the edge of a plateau area, adjacent to the foothills which rise to the Southern Alps. It altitude is 385 metres and it enjoys an alpine climate. The thermal pools are close to the rising hills but on fairly level ground which slopes gradually to the south.

The land on which the Queen Mary Hospital was established alongside the pools has some minor undulations with a more noticeable dip behind the Rutherford Ward, where a minor water way defines the edge of the hospital site (outside the proposed historic area). On the western boundary a more substantial stream separates hospital land from the golf course.

Buildings are located throughout the site so that each of the main hospital blocks is in a spacious setting with green surroundings. All are enhanced by the surrounding trees and views to the mountains.

Current Physical Condition:

Lack of use is not good for any of the buildings in ownership by the Canterbury District Health Board, though they were well maintained when their care was the Board's responsibility. It will be beneficial if the future of the site can be decided soon. The condition of the Soldiers Ward, Chisholm Ward and the Nurses' Home is reasonable. The condition of the other buildings varies with the most concern over the two bath and massage blocks because of the presence of asbestos.

On the pools site the Tea House was recently restored and the Gasometer was stabilised in 1992.

Since the hospital closed, a reduced regime of gardening care has been followed but it has been sufficient to maintain the property in fair condition with lawns mowed and the garden plots attended to.

Construction Dates

Completion Date

28th January 2005

Report Written By

Pam Wilson

Information Sources

Archives New Zealand (Chch)

Archives New Zealand (Christchurch)

Queen Mary Hospital, Hanmer, File CH 556.

Burgess, 2004

Robyn Burgess, 'Queen Mary Hospital, Hanmer Springs, Heritage Assessment', Prepared for Hurunui District Council by Opus International, June 2004

Cable, 2004

Nicolas Cable, 'An appraisal of Archaeological values within the Queen Mary Hospital Site, Hanmer Springs', Prepared for Hurunui District Council by Opus International, June 2004

Clarke, nd

Russell Clarke, ''Not mad, but very ill' :the treatment of shellshocked soldiers 1914 to 1939 MA History thesis, Hocken Library, University of Otago

Ensor, 1983

Rosemary Ensor, 'Much ado - A century in Hanmer Springs, 1883-1853', Hanmer Springs Centennial Committee, 1983

Gardner, 1983

W.J. Gardner, The Amuri: a county history, 2nd edn, Culverden, 1983

Hanmer Springs Golden Jubilee, 1953

Golden Jubilee Celebrations Committee, 'Hanmer Springs Golden Jubilee 1883-1953', 1953

Lucas Associates, 2004

Lucas Associates, Landscape Assessment, Queen Mary Hospital, Hanmer Springs. Prepared for Hurunui District Council, July 2004

New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT)

New Zealand Historic Places Trust

Nomination Form

New Zealand Listener

New Zealander Listener

Dennis Welch, 'Who killed the Queen?', 29 December 2003

Rockel, 1986

Ian Rockel, Taking the Waters: Early Spas in New Zealand, Wellington, 1986

Watson, 2004

Katherine Watson, Hanmer Springs Gas Holder: An Archaeological Assessment. New Zealand Historic Places Trust, Christchurch. 2004.

Other Information

Extract from New Zealand Gazette, 12/8/2010, No. 99, p. 2643 Decision made in Christchurch 10 Aug 2010.

Recreation Reserve: Area 0.6600ha. Lot 1 DP 426562 (all Computer Freehold Register 504568), subject to easements created in documents 8377291.2, 8509780.5, 8526862.1, 8530111.1 and 8501109.1.

Historic Reserve: Area 5.1680ha. Lots 2 and 3 DP 430432 (all Computer Freehold Register 518495), subject to easements created in documents 8377291.2, 8509780.5, 8526862.1, 8530111.1, 8501109.1 and 8501109.2.

A fully referenced version of this report is available from the NZHPT Southern Region Office.

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rarangi Korero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.

Historic Area Place Name

Chisholm Ward
Fountain House (1943)
Gymnasium (1929-30)
Maintenance Office (1916)
Soldiers Block
The Gardener's Shed c.(1900?)
The Gasometer (1899)
The Nurses' Home (1928)
The Tea House
Trees and landscape