Lost Heritage 2016-2020

Explore the stories of various heritage places that have been regretfully lost to development, fires, neglect, storms and other natural disasters and were removed from the New Zealand Heritage List during 2016.

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Discover the diversity of our heritage places.

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During 2016

Dalgety Office Building
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Dalgety Office Building (former), Blenheim

2 Alfred Street, Sinclair Street and Grove Road, Blenheim
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#1511)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished April- June 2016.

The former Dalgety Office Building was built in 1884. It got its name after a merger between The New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency and another stock and station firm, Dalgety and Co., one of many stock and station companies that used to operate in Blenheim.

Trathern's Building
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Trathen's Building, Nelson

191 Trafalgar Street, Nelson
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#1617)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished July 2016.

Built in 1922, this building had been home to Trathen's department store in Nelson for over 70 years.

House, 81 Haven Road Nelson
Copyright: John Warrenexpand/collapse

House, Nelson

81 Haven Road, Nelson
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#5166)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished April 2016.

The house at 81 Haven Road was a simple single-storey villa, presumed to have been built circa 1900.

Te Urewera National Park Visitor Centre
Copyright: Scott Whanau.expand/collapse

Te Urewera National Park Visitor Centre (former), Lake Waikaremoana

6395 Lake Road (State Highway 38), Aniwaniwa, Lake Waikaremoana
Originally entered in the List as a Category 1 historic place (#9553)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished September 2016.

The former Te Urewera National Park Visitor Centre at Aniwaniwa sat amidst a rich landscape of natural beauty and cultural and traditional significance. Designed by prominent architect John Scott in the early 1970s, the building aimed to respond to the immense importance of its surroundings through carefully considered form and pathways to honour the beauty and wairua of the landscape, and function as a storehouse of invaluable taonga and the visitor gateway to New Zealand’s fourth largest national park.