Architect Roy Wilson Remembered

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga staff who worked with Warren & Mahoney partner and director, Roy Wilson, FNZIA, remember a man of great respect, of dedication to heritage preservation, and for his humour. Roy sadly passed away in Lower Hutt at the end of August, following a long illness.


Roy Wilson smiles.
Roy Wilson. Credit: Supplied.expand/collapse

Roy had a significant impact on the practice of Warren & Mahoney, joining Sir Miles Warren as a Partner in 1978 and the following year founding the Wellington studio in 1979. 

After a stint running his own practice and commencing work with Warren & Mahoney in Christchurch, the Wellington studio under Roy’s leadership oversaw the development of the Michael Fowler Centre auditorium and conference centre, which has over the years been acknowledged to have superior acoustic qualities by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra.

He had a career in architecture that extended over 50 years and led to many notable and high-profile projects of local, regional and national significance. Two highlights included the 1990 strengthening and refurbishment of Parliament Buildings, and the, then named, Westpac Trust Stadium in Wellington in 2000. Roy contributed many years to the conservation of parliament buildings and the government precinct, the parliamentary library and executive wing (commonly known as the Beehive).

Other key projects in Wellington included the construction of Bowen House in 1990, Fletcher Challenge House on The Terrace, the Salvation Army Citadel and head office in Cuba St, the Maritime Tower in 2006, the strengthening of the Old High Court Building in Stout St, and the award-winning addition the Supreme Court of New Zealand in 2010. He also led the architectural team on the redevelopment of the National Library of New Zealand in 2013.

Roy established a reputation for outstanding performance and excellence in his practice. He had a great passion for heritage architecture and his contribution to the built fabric of Wellington, especially through the city’s heritage buildings that have been saved and adapted, will be a lasting legacy of his leadership. 

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga extends its heartfelt thoughts to Roy’s wife Sandra, and family in their loss.  

David Watt