Mangahawea Dig Monday 13 January 2020

13/01/2020

Anna Maria Rossi has stepped in to continue the Mangahawea blog, with Laura Dawson having returned to Wellington.  Anna Maria is an archaeologist currently working as a Project Advisor with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.


It is the start of the second and last week of excavations at Mangahawea and I am excited to be part of this wonderful project. The day started early for this new recruit, meeting at the Kerikeri Department of Conservation office to go through sleeping bags, boots and tents for a bio security check and to load gear on the boat.
 

After a scenic, short drive to the Kerikeri Marina we were on our way to the island of Moturua, nestled in the beautiful Bay of Islands. A dead calm sea made the trip to the island particularly pleasant and a blue penguin was clearly enjoying it too!

The white stretch of sand of Mangahawea Bay slowly appeared in front of us and the pou, unveiled last November to celebrate the connection between Aotearoa and the rest of Polynesia, welcomed us.

The karakia by kaumātua Matu Clendon marked the beginning of the work on site. 

My first day in the field went fast and I mainly worked on a 19th century layer with some interesting artefacts such as fragmented clay pipes (one manufactured in Glasgow) and a couple of military buttons, one of those engraved. The day finished in style eating kina by the beach. Thanks Matu for harvesting them for us.

  • Fragmented clay pipes
    Fragmented clay pipes
  • Engraved military button found in a 19th century layer
    Engraved military button found in a 19th century layer
  • Harvesting kina
    Harvesting kina
  • Karakia by kaumātua Matu Clendon marked the beginning of the work on site

    Kaumātua Matu Clendon marking the beginning of the work on site with a karakia

  • Bio security check at the Kerikeri Department of Conservation office
    Bio security check at the Kerikeri Department of Conservation office
  • Loading gear onto the boat

    Loading gear onto the boat

  • The pou, unveiled last November to celebrate the connection between Aotearoa and the rest of Polynesia, welcomed us.

    The pou celebrating the connection between Aotearoa and the rest of Polynesia