Six Sisters Historic Area

185-205 Marine Parade, Napier South, Napier 4110

  • Six Sisters Historic Area, Napier. Image courtesy of www.flickr.com.
    Copyright: Andrew Caldwell. Taken By: Andrew Caldwell. Date: 20/04/2014.
  • Six Sisters Historic Area, Napier.
    Copyright: Heritage New Zealand. Taken By: Joanna Barnes-Wylie. Date: 8/08/2020.
  • Six Sisters Historic Area, Napier. CC BY 2.0 Image courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.
    Copyright: Tony Hisgett - Wikimedia Commons. Taken By: Tony Hisgett. Date: 3/12/2016.
  • Six Sisters Historic Area, Napier. Albion Hotel, Marine Parade. Image courtesy of Auckland Libraries Heritage Collections, Record #958-55.
    Copyright: Auckland Libraries . Taken By: Vera Jane Ellis. Date: 18/02/1963.

List Entry Information

List Entry Status Listed List Entry Type Historic Area Public Access Private/No Public Access
List Number 1053 Date Entered 18th February 2021 Date of Effect 10th March 2021

Locationopen/close

Extent of List Entry

This historic area consists of an area of land that contains a group of inter-related historic places. The identified historic places that contribute to the values in this historic area are Houses (Former) at the street addresses 185, 189, 193, 197, 201, and 205 Marine Parade, Napier. The area of land that encompasses these historic places, includes the land described as Lot 1 DP 12445 (RT HBD3/950); Lots 2, 5-6 DEED 763 (RT HB113/99); Lot 3 DEED 763 (RT HBB1/282); Lot 1 DP 7138 (RT HB113/232); Lot 2 DP 7138 and Lot 1 DP 323741 (RT 95652); and Lot 2 DP 323741 (RT 95653), Hawkes Bay Land District. (Refer to map in Appendix 1 of the List entry report for further information).

City/District Council

Napier City

Region

Hawke's Bay Region

Legal description

Lot 1 DP 12445 (RT HBD3/950); Lots 2, 5-6 DEED 763 (RT HB113/99); Lot 3 DEED 763 (RT HBB1/282); Lot 1 DP 7138 (RT HB113/232); Lot 2 DP 7138 and Lot 1 DP 323741 (RT 95652); and Lot 2 DP 323741 (RT 95653), Hawkes Bay Land District

Location description

185, 189, 193, 197, 201, 205 Marine Parade, Napier

NZTM Easting: 1937028; Northing: 5621235

Legal description: Lot 1 DP 12445 (RT HBD3/950); Lots 2, 5-6 DEED 763 (RT HB113/99); Lot 3 DEED 763 (RT HBB1/282); Lot 1 DP 7138 (RT HB113/232); Lot 2 DP 7138 and Lot 1 DP 323741 (RT 95652); and Lot 2 DP 323741 (RT 95653), Hawkes Bay Land District

Summaryopen/close

The Six Sisters, located at 185, 189, 193, 197, 201 and 205 Marine Parade, are a beloved Napier landmark forming an appealingly orderly continuous row of Victorian villas with views of the foreshore and Pacific Ocean. It is likely that the two-storey timber villas were constructed in the early 1900s. They have architectural significance as good representatives of the Victorian ‘up-and-down’ villa, historical significance as a visible link to the early development of Napier, and are a rare surviving reminder of the central Napier streetscape which existed before the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake and subsequent fires devastated this area. The community esteem for, and aesthetic appeal of, the Six Sisters is evident in the assortment of tourist merchandise which features them and the art they inspire.

Napier was first surveyed in 1855. It grew steadily to become the administrative, commercial and social hub for the province. The Six Sisters were probably one of the last designs by Robert Lamb, a versatile British-born architect who worked in Napier between [1879 and 1895]. It is likely that the Six Sisters were constructed shortly after his death.

The villas were built to the same, but twice-reversed, architectural plan. However the houses, from their front elevation, still retain the basic form and structure with which they were originally built. The main changes have been the enclosure of balconies and the replacement of some original sash windows. Original lean-to extensions have also been removed to make way for rear additions. However, these changes have not detrimentally affected the group’s character and contribution to the streetscape, the quality and scale of which is still maintained.

From carpenters to hairdressers, the occupants of the houses were initially an assortment of Napier’s working class. From the 1980s the buildings went onto have a variety of commercial uses, including as an architectural studio, restaurant, café, head office for a shipping company, varied galleries and art and souvenir shops. After internal modifications, some houses (or parts of houses) have reverted back to their original use as private residences or flats.

Assessment criteriaopen/close

Historical Significance or Value

The Six Sisters have historic significance as representatives of the nineteenth century development of Marine Parade and wider Napier city. As rare central city survivors of the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake and the devastating fires which destroyed much of the central business district they are linked to a major event in the city’s history. The owners and occupants have encompassed a wide variety of occupations and are representative of Napier’s working class residents, while the shift from solely residential to commercial or mixed use from the 1980s shows how building use has evolved in this city and tourist destination. Local historical value is derived from the use of one Sister as the unofficial embassy for Pitcairn Island in the 1960s and another was a studio of well-known local architect Paris Magdalinos.

Aesthetic Significance or Value

The Six Sisters form an orderly and continuous row and have aesthetic value as a cluster of picturesque residences designed by the same architect as a coherent group. Their near-identical (twice reversed) architectural design attracts attention and makes them an obvious and striking grouping pleasing to the eye. Their varied colour scheme also contributes to their charm and reference the ‘Painted Ladies’ of San Francisco. Their position overlooking Marine Parade and the ocean enables them to be viewed as a whole and enhances their visual impact within the streetscape. They contribute to the passer-by’s sense of place on the Napier waterfront and their aesthetic qualities continue to be a source of creative inspiration for artists and tourist merchandise-makers alike.

Architectural Significance or Value

The Six Sisters are a representative group of a typical architectural style and trend in New Zealand residential design. These characteristic two-storey timber ‘up-and-down’ Victorian villas were likely designed by Napier architect Robert Lamb and are a good example of urban Victorian villas in New Zealand built in the late 19th century. Despite all of the buildings undergoing significant alterations and additions the front elevations of the group retains architectural integrity, visual impact and character.

Social Significance or Value

Napier’s Six Sisters are a local landmark held in high community esteem by both locals and visitors, an esteem enhanced by their survival from events that claimed many of the pre-1931 buildings in the city. Their appeal to tourists is evident from the range of targeted merchandise which features them as well as the stories that people still tell about their design and construction. Today the buildings are desirable real estate benefiting from the prestige of the Six Sisters and their (often fictitious) urban legends.

Summary of Significance or Values

The Six Sisters are an architecturally characteristic row of six, two-storey, timber ‘up-and-down’ Victorian villas. The group has architectural and aesthetic significance for their repeated design – likely to be that of prominent late nineteenth century Napier architect Robert Lamb. The Six Sisters have historic significance as representative of the late nineteenth century development of Marine Parade and wider Napier and are rare central city survivors from this period due to the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake and the devastating fires that ensued. Historically, the owners and occupants have been employed in a wide variety of occupations, representative of Napier’s working class residents, while the shift from solely residential to commercial or mixed use from the 1980s shows how building use has evolved along with their city. Their aesthetic and social significance is evident in the wide range of artistic output and tourist merchandise which features them and the urban narratives surrounding them.

Linksopen/close

Construction Professionalsopen/close

Lamb, Robert

English architect Richard Lamb, F.R.I.B.A (1834-1895), arrived in Napier on 27 June 1879 with his wife and children, having come from England aboard the barque Celaeno. Lamb was described in a testimonial published in the Hawke's Bay Herald as an 'eminent architect of Darlington'. He had a large and lucrative practice there, but failing health had induced him to leave in the hope of finding a more congenial climate in New Zealand. Before leaving England he had received the most flattering presentations both at Darlington and at New castle. One of these was from the Northern Architectural Association, of which he had been a member for 21 years, and expressed sympathy that he was compelled to relinquish his duties which he had so long and honourably fulfilled, and regret at their loss of his society.

Lamb favoured Gothic Revival styles in his domestic, commercial and church architecture. He was employed to work on a number of distinguished buildings throughout Napier. In March 1881 Robert Lamb was appointed Municipal Engineer to the Borough of Napier, after a long and acrimonious battle in Council over the two major candidates for the position. The salary was £300 per annum, but it was decreased to £100 in September 1882. In May 1883 Lamb accepted the position of Consulting Engineer with the Borough Council for a salary of £100; his duties were virtually the same as when he was Municipal Engineer. In January 1883 Lamb was appointed to the position of Board Architect to the Hawke's Bay Education Board, which he held until his death on 14 June 1895.

Additional informationopen/close

Historical Narrative

Early Napier

Māori settled in the Hawke’s Bay area relatively early in New Zealand’s history. Settlement would have been encouraged by food sources which were plentiful both inland, in the lagoon, and along the coast. Whatumamoa, Rangitāne, Ngāti Awa and Ngāi Tara became established in the areas of Pētane, Te Whanganui-a-Orotū and Waiohiki. From the 16th century these iwi were displaced by Ngāti Kahungunu, whose influence eventually spread from Poverty Bay to as far south as Wellington. In the 1840s and 50s contact between these iwi and Europeans was limited to the whalers, missionaries and itinerant traders who plied their trade along the coast, but in 1851 a key land deal was struck. The Ahuriri Purchase was negotiated by Land Commissioner Donald McLean on behalf of the Crown. It was followed by other smaller land purchases in the area. Europeans settled in the region to grow crops and farm animals and the township of Napier was founded in 1855. Other land in the area changed hands and by 1859, the Crown had purchased an estimated 1,404,700 acres (568,462 hectares) of land from iwi in the area.

Napier, in its early days, was an area nearly entirely surrounded by swamp and sea. It was described as ‘a precipitous island of barren, uninhabited ridges, covered with fern and rough grass, dissected by gorges and ravines, with a narrow strip of shingle skirting the cliffs, and joined to the mainland south by a five mile shingle bank… A hopeless spot for a town site’. Despite this inauspicious assessment, Napier developed to become a busy port town servicing the Hawke’s Bay area and exporting meat, wool and dairy from those working the land. Napier grew steadily to become the administrative, commercial, and social hub for the area. It formally changed its status from borough to city in 1950 when its population hit 20,000.

Victorian Napier

As Napier prospered, Marine Parade (originally called Beach Road) became a feature of its waterfront. The township was threatened by encroaching waves during bad weather; in 1877 the Napier Municipal Council began the construction of a seawall to address the problem, with variable success. Yet Mayor George Swan (1833-1913) described a vision he had for the Marine Parade – that of a ‘grand esplanade’ inspired by the promenades of iconic British seaside towns. To this end, he had Norfolk pines planted along the foreshore, footpaths built and a band rotunda constructed. His vision for Marine Parade required a solid seawall to eventuate and in 1888 the problem of the inadequacies of the seawall was again before the council. Eventually further sections of a new seawall (List No. 1164) were undertaken, with a concrete parapet above the road level, constructed with prison labour. The final section was finished in 1892 and allowed further development along the foreshore.

It is widely believed that the Six Sisters were built to a design by architect Robert Lamb. English born Lamb arrived in Napier in 1879, seeking a temperate climate to improve his ill-health. A versatile architect, he designed a wide range of buildings, influenced by Gothic Revival style. He turned his hand to country homesteads, community halls, churches and townhouses, including Balquhidder House for Captain McGregor, Tintagel for JD Ormond, St Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church, and renovations to Ben Lomond House. Lamb, like Swan, had ‘a bold scheme’ for development of the Marine Parade. A drawing by Lamb in 1889 expresses his vision for the development of Marine Parade. Lamb designed a group of Victorian villas on Marine Parade, which later became known as the Six Sisters, the year before his death in 1895, and the start of the construction to his design probably began a year or two after that.

The popularity of villas as a design choice in urban centres between 1895 and 1910 was not only because they were fashionable, but also because they met the needs of New Zealand’s speculative builders and developers. They were usually single storey detached buildings constructed in native timbers built in groups to the same design, closely spaced and located on narrow sites. Typical characteristics include front verandas, high ceilings, sash windows, wide hallways and a lean-to extension at the rear for kitchen, scullery and laundry. There were numerous variations of plans for villas in New Zealand, some being constructed using pattern books and others were designed by architects. Even for those timber houses built between the 1860s and 1910 which did not share an identical plan, the designs were similar as, for timber villas, ‘the recipe remained basically the same’.

Six Sisters

The Six Sisters were constructed to the same plan and look very similar. Some of the differences visible today were part of the original plan and others were later modifications. For two of the houses – 193 Marine Parade and 189 Marine Parade – the plan was identical but reversed. Robert Lamb’s great-granddaughter Eleanor Holmes explains that the Six Sisters were built in two groups, the first probably in the early 1900s. Later changes were made to the entranceways, several verandas were enclosed, fencing added and colour schemes chosen. While obviously a set, these differences make each building unique within the group.

In New Zealand the design of the villa reflected their owners’ ‘social position and material achievement’. The Six Sisters were sometimes occupied by owners, but many housed tenants. The Wises New Zealand Post Office Directories record the panoply of predominantly working class occupants. From the 1910s and 1920s occupants included clerk Samuel Sharp, engineer Isaac Fisk, nurses Isabella Campbell and Lottie Donald, a government inspector of machinery William Douglas, photographer Leslie Deighton and motorman Boyd Mitchell. By the 1930s the occupants included warehouseman Claude Lodge, packer Jason Lock, labourer William Adams and carpenter Aubrey Crabtree. At the southernmost building (now known as 205 Marine Parade), Minnie Plunkett operated a small boarding house for at least 20 years though the 1940s and 1950s, during which time other occupants included French furniture polisher Arthur Stowell, pastry chef Jason Campbell, barman Donald Seaton and hairdresser Leila Mellor. Throughout there was a number of widows, an early example being Mrs Bridget Johnson in 1915.

The Howse family at 201 Marine Parade were also residents of note. David Howse, a company manager, and his wife Mary’s home gained an international connection when it became the ‘unofficial embassy’ of Pitcairn Island in New Zealand. Their son, Murray Howse, worked as a schoolmaster on Pitcairn Island between 1959 and 1962. He returned to the island again with his wife Rita, their three children and an archaeological team led by Peter Gathercole from 1963 to 1964. The connection of Number 201 Marine Parade to the island continued throughout this period and ended in the early 1980s when the Howse family moved away.

The properties were all designed as residential homes, but in the 1980s and through into the 1990s there was a marked transition from residential to commercial use. This included the opening at various times of art galleries, a property management company, an arts collective, a financial service provider, souvenir shops and, at 189 Marine Parade, a succession of restaurants from Pickwick’s to Poivre et Sel. The upstairs space of these ventures was frequently used as modest flats which accommodated the operators of a business below. They reconfigured the ground floor space by removing walls to open up a central space suitable for commercial use. The demolition of the rear lean-to was undertaken on most of the properties and new rear extensions were added. In just one example, ‘Gemini’ opened at 189 Marine Parade in 1982, selling souvenirs, handicrafts and memorabilia to tourists meandering along the foreshore. This change to commercial use was invigorated by the growth of Napier and the houses’ proximity to the city’s commercial centre and location on the waterfront promenade.

The regard for and location of these buildings has made them desirable real estate, lending prestige to the businesses within. At 193 Marine Parade major changes were undertaken by the owners to convert the building from residential accommodation to office space. Olsen Shipping Limited, like the building, had its origins in the late 1800s, shipping cargo from the Port of Napier to destinations around the globe. In 1999 they chose this building for their head office as they believed that the building could positively reflect the stature of their company. Proximity to the port was also an advantage, as was the upstairs level which provided a lookout of the sea view enabling staff to see ships approaching and departing from the port. In 2000 the company converted both levels of the building to purpose-built office space. They removed the rear kitchen and washhouse entirely and replaced them with a major new extension designed by Stuart Angus Associates. This addition doubled the footprint of the ground level of the building. Olsen Shipping have been able to create a space that takes advantage of the prestige of the building’s original design and front elevation, but put it to use as a functional and modern office space.

In 1984 architectural firm Hoogerbrug, Magdalinos & Williams opened its doors at 205 Marine Parade. They painted the building’s exterior a bold green with blue and pale yellow trim, the interior with bright primary colours and furnished it with ‘modern linear furniture’. Originally they formed a partnership between Dutch-born Len Hoogerburg, structural engineer Bruce Williams and Paris Magdalinos, but by 1989 Magdalinos was practicing independently. A charismatic architect and believed to be New Zealand’s first of Greek descent, Magdalinos arrived here as a refugee in 1953. He trained at Auckland University and went on to specialise in local large-scale commercial and top-end residential projects, carrying out his work with ‘vision, zeal and inimitable flair’. In 1990 he received national acclaim when he was awarded the New Zealand Institute of Architects Award of Honour for his ‘outstanding contribution and dedicated service to the profession’. In 2002 Magdalinos moved his architectural practice to new premises at 93 Station Street in Napier and 205 Marine Parade passed to new ownership.

Unlike Lamb’s architectural records, these buildings survived both the Hawke’s Bay Earthquake in 1931 and the devastating central business district fires which ensued. The only subsequent calamity of note was a kitchen fire which occurred at 201 Marine Parade in 2002 causing fire and smoke damage which was repaired.

There is a thriving and still evolving lore and legend surrounding the early history of these buildings. Locals recount to tourists the story of six houses designed for the six daughters of architect Robert Lamb (or in another version, a prosperous businessman and, in yet another version, a wealthy sea captain). Lamb’s great-granddaughter Eleanor Holmes assures us that these oft-repeated stories have no basis in fact. Lamb, she explains, only had four daughters, none of whom ever lived at the property. Magdalinos also contributed a story; noticing the difference in the gable between the first northern three buildings and the second southern set of three, he suggested in a magazine feature that the finials of the three northernmost buildings gave them ‘masculine connotations’, and suggested renaming them the Three Sisters and Three Brothers.

For many these buildings are wrapped up in the nostalgia for the past. Like others of their type, the Six Sisters can be considered as ‘icons – visual metaphors which evoke and capture an historic European presence in this land’. Their proximity to the sea, and their sometimes jaunty colour scheme and the opportunity to purchase coffee from the Six Sisters Café contribute to the seaside ambiance. These photogenic buildings contribute to the Marine Parade seascape and countless visitors have posed in front of the buildings; they also have inspired many magazine articles. The Six Sisters’ contribution to tourism in Napier is also evident in the assortment of merchandise available from the Six Sisters Café at 201 Marine Parade, Arts on Parade at 185 Marine Parade and the nearby Napier iSITE Visitor Centre. Merchandise artwork makes use of the distinctive exteriors and strong architectural lines to produce both black and white and more colourful artwork which sits alongside Art Deco merchandise for the perusal of visiting tourists looking to purchase mementos of their Napier holiday experience.

Physical Description

Current Description

The Six Sisters are an orderly and continuous row of six two storey, ‘up-and-down’ Victorian villas at 185, 189, 193, 197, 201 and 205 Marine Parade, Napier. Their handsome exteriors, assorted colours and repetition of design make their presence a striking feature of this part of Napier’s townscape. They are located on the western side of Napier’s Marine Parade, south of the centre of Napier’s central business district, running north-south in parallel with the road and foreshore. They front into a one-way street with car parking spaces and a traffic island with regularly spaced mature Norfolk Pine trees. Beyond the traffic island is a two-way street also running in parallel to the foreshore. The Six Sisters are bounded at their northern end with a modern, large multiple storey glass building, and to their southern end by a small alleyway called Faulknor Lane, a crooked road that links to Hastings Street, which runs parallel to Marine Parade. Their position overlooking Marine Parade and the ocean enables them to be viewed as a whole. This enhances their visual impact and lends the buildings a spacious, cheerful, seaside atmosphere of which former Mayor George Swan would certainly have approved.

The front elevations of the Six Sisters are reasonably intact. All the villas are clad in rusticated timber weatherboard with a pitched gable roof with external brackets on the front elevation. Each has a set of sash windows upstairs and additional windows on the ground level with timber frames. Most have a recessed balcony with balustrades and an arch and a decorative centrally placed door in a recessed entrance porch. There is a painted timber fence (and in one instance a brick fence) enclosing the front section of each house. They are spaced at regular intervals with a small alleyway between each.

All six houses were built to the same original design as private residences but 193 and 189 Marine Parade were constructed to a reversed design. Robert Lamb’s great-granddaughter, Eleanor Holmes believes that the Six Sisters were built in two groups of three, a theory supported by the subtle differences to the decorative fretwork. Numbers 185, 189 and 193 Marine Parade all have scroll-like carved detailing on the gable and decorative finials crafted by a tradesman (or ‘artisan’) from ‘the Continent’, whereas 197, 201 and 205 Marine Parade have plainer fretwork and no finials.

The main changes visible in the front elevation have been the enclosure of three of the upstairs balconies at 189, 193 and 197 Marine Parade, and the replacement of the downstairs original sash windows with plate glass to improve sea views at all properties except 205 Marine Parade. French doors replace the downstairs windows and open out to small timber balconies at 201 and 189 Marine Parade. At 201 and 185 Marine Parade the ground floor windows have been extended out. Number 193, 189 and 185 Marine Parade have fretwork on the gable and finials at the apex of their pitched gable roofs. The windows on the ground level have been constructed or modified to several different designs. Number 189 Marine Parade has a brick fence and entranceway rather than a timber one. These changes have not detrimentally affected the group’s essential character.

Some of the buildings do retain interior heritage fabric, but overall there is little that is original. The least changed of the row are 185, 197 and 205 Marine Parade. Surviving original interior features include the pairs of unique triangular backed ground floor fireplaces to ceiling height, their mantelpieces, board and batten ceilings, some windows and the original ornate timber staircases. All have undergone alterations to open up the ground floor space.

The rear sections of all of the buildings have also undergone major change. An exception to this is 185 Marine Parade which retains its original rear lean-to and backyard space. At some point the other five buildings underwent the demolition of their original backyard lean-tos and major new rear extensions were constructed. An exception to this was 205 Marine Parade which was subdivided and now the backyard provides vehicle access to 201 Marine Parade. The need to earthquake strengthen has also impacted on the interior of the buildings. Various strengthening solutions have included the insertion of steel portals and the removal of chimneys.

As timber buildings in close proximity to the ocean, they require periodic repainting and their current varied colour scheme contributes to their charm. It references both New Zealand villas in Wellington’s Mt Cook (Wright Street Houses Historic Area, List No. 7630), Oriental Parade (Oriental Parade Historic Area, List No. 7039) and Thorndon, and more famously (and more outrageously) the ‘Painted Ladies’ of San Francisco.

Construction Dates

Original Construction
-
All six buildings built

Modification
-
Modification at 185 Marine Parade: front window changed to a bay window with awning.

Addition
1946 -
Addition at 197 Marine Parade: Extra room added to lean-to washhouse at the rear

Addition
1953 -
Addition at 205 Marine Parade: extra bathroom and laundry accommodation added to rear lean-to

Partial Demolition
-
Partial demolition at 205 Marine Parade: rear extension demolished

Maintenance/repairs
-
Maintenance/repairs at 193 Marine Parade: replied

Refurbishment/renovation
-
Refurbishment/renovation at 197 Marine Parade: building three internal arches in existing walls to create one large gallery space

Addition
-
Addition at both 197 and 201 Marine Parade: a new front fence

Refurbishment/renovation
-
Refurbishment/renovation at 189 Marine Parade converts dwelling/residence into a licensed restaurant with dining space and kitchen downstairs and a lounge, bathrooms and bar upstairs and pergola with trellis at the rear of the property.

Refurbishment/renovation
1985 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 201 Marine Parade: altered for café, walls lined with GIB

Refurbishment/renovation
1992 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 189 Marine Parade: new bar installed in the central dining area on ground floor.

Modification
1994 -
Modification at 185 Marine Parade: rear window is replaced with French doors and internal partition is removed.

Structural upgrade
1996 -
Structural upgrade at 189 Marine Parade: Steel portal frames installed on ground level, supporting walls and first floor.

Modification
-
Modification at 189 Marine Parade: Significant internal walls removed. Existing veranda stripped out and glazed. New double fold French doors at ground floor front.

Other
-
Other at 189 Marine Parade: brick wall constructed with brick pillars supporting a canvas covered canopy.

Addition
1999 -
Addition at 197 Marine Parade: extra office space and new toilet added in rear extension

Modification
-
Modification at 197 Marine Parade: upstairs veranda is filled in.

Modification
-
Modification at 197 Marine Parade: downstairs sash windows replaced with a front window with four stained glass panels.

Partial Demolition
2000 -
Partial demolition at 193 Marine Parade: rear extension lean-to demolished

Addition
2000 -
Addition at 193 Marine Parade: major extension at rear.

Refurbishment/renovation
2000 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 193 Marine Parade: both levels converted to office space. Replacement of front door.

Modification
2000 -
Modification at 193 Marine Parade: exterior rusticated timber weatherboard cladding removed and replaced with GIB Fyreline plasterboard and clad in HardieFlex sheet.

Modification
-
Modification at 193 Marine Parade: veranda enclosed.

Modification
-
Modification: ground floor window at front is replaced with a wider window.

Refurbishment/renovation
2000 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 189 Marine Parade: Internal alterations including enlargement of the kitchen area.

Refurbishment/renovation
2001 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 189 Marine Parade: alterations for use as dwelling.

Maintenance/repairs
2002 -
Maintenance/repairs at 201 Marine Parade: repairs to fire damage in kitchen and first floor.

Partial Demolition
-
Partial demolition at 189 Marine Parade: Demolition of rear lean-to extension.

Refurbishment/renovation
2003 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 205 Marine Parade: new toilets and kitchenette.

Physical access improvements
2003 -
Physical access improvements at 205 Marine Parade: accessible toilet and concrete ramp

Maintenance/repairs
2004 -
Maintenance/repairs at 197 Marine Parade: Repiled.

Partial Demolition
2004 -
Partial demolition at 201 Marine Parade: rear lean-to with kitchenette and outhouse demolished.

Addition
2004 -
Addition at 201 Marine Parade: new two storey extension and double bay garage at rear linked to the existing building.

Maintenance/repairs
2004 -
Maintenance/repairs at 201 Marine Parade: replace roof.

Addition
2004 -
Addition at 201 Marine Parade: new projecting French doors at front on ground floor.

Refurbishment/renovation
2004 -
Refurbishment at 201 Marine Parade: interior.

Addition
2010 -
Addition at 189 Marine Parade: new bathroom upstairs and new mezzanine to rear of building.

Refurbishment/renovation
2010 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 201 Marine Parade: conversion to two hotel units and ground floor garage conversion to small rear flat.

Refurbishment/renovation
2013 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 201 Marine Parade: conversion to café.

Structural upgrade
2015 -
Structural Upgrade at 189 Marine Parade: removal of chimney, steel bracing portals installed and the original chimney removed.

Refurbishment/renovation
2018 -
Refurbishment/renovation at 205 Marine Parade: conversion back to residential.

Construction Details

Timber, glass, brick, iron roof, steel

Completion Date

17th December 2020

Report Written By

Miranda Williamson

Information Sources

Campbell, 1975

M. D. N. Campbell, Story of Napier, 1874-1974; Footprints Along the Shore

Stewart, 1992 (2002)

Di Stewart, The New Zealand Villa Past and Present, Auckland, 1992 (2002)

Holmes, 2002

Eleanor Holmes (compiler). ‘Robert Lamb F.R.I.B.A.: The Napier, New Zealand years, 1879 to 1895.’ Berry Historical Library, Hawke’s Bay Museum and Art Gallery. 2002

Magdalinos, 1998

Magdalinos, Bobbi, ‘Uniformity Equals Diversity’, Napier Life, Oct 1998, pp.60-63.

Salmond, 1986

Salmond, Jeremy, Old New Zealand Houses 1800-1940, Auckland, Reed, 1986.

Other Information

A fully referenced New Zealand Heritage List report is available on request from the Central Region Office of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. Information in square brackets in the Executive Summary denotes a correction made after the report was considered by the Heritage New Zealand Board.

Disclaimer

Please note that entry on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero identifies only the heritage values of the property concerned, and should not be construed as advice on the state of the property, or as a comment of its soundness or safety, including in regard to earthquake risk, safety in the event of fire, or insanitary conditions.

Archaeological sites are protected by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, regardless of whether they are entered on the New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero or not. Archaeological sites include ‘places associated with pre-1900 human activity, where there may be evidence relating to the history of New Zealand’. This List entry report should not be read as a statement on whether or not the archaeological provisions of the Act apply to the property (s) concerned. Please contact your local Heritage New Zealand office for archaeological advice.

Historic Area Place Name

House (Former)