Lost heritage 2016-2020

Explore the stories of various heritage places that have been regretfully lost to development, fires, neglect, storms and other natural disasters and were removed from the New Zealand Heritage List during 2016.

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Pine Terrace, Hapuku Kaikoura
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Pine Terrace, Hapuku, Kaikoura

620 Main North Road (State Highway 1, also known as Kincaid Road), Hapuku, Kaikoura
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#2913)

Lost to: Earthquake, demolished in October 2018.

Pine Terrace was the original homestead of a farm established by Kaikoura pioneer Joseph Hailes during the intensive settlement of the Kaikoura district in the 1870s. A simple cottage, it remained in the Hailes family well into the 21st century and was recently occupied by a descendent. The house had been adapted over the years to meet the changing needs of each generation.

House, 28 Ranfurly Street, Palmerston North
Copyright: Palmerston North
City Councilexpand/collapse

House, Palmerston North

28 Ranfurly Street, Palmeraton North
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#1263)

Lost to: Fire and redevelopment, between January and October 2018.

The house at 28 Ranfurly Street was a beautifully detailed corner angle bay villa with aesthetic and architectural heritage value.  Despite its relatively modest size, it had considerable presence owing to its particularly complicated arrangement of bays and verandah.  The house’s authenticity of design and materials on the exterior is impressive and compared well to more substantial historic places in Palmerston North.

During 2017

Ngatiawa Bridge
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Ngatiawa Bridge, Reikorangi, Waikanae

Mangaone South Road, Reikorangi, Waikanae
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#7189)

Lost to: Collapse in October 2017.

The Ngatiawa Bridge, built 1912-1913, was a good example of a Howe truss bridge, which were once common throughout New Zealand. It was built over the Ngatiawa Stream, to serve the local community and the timber-milling industry of the South Mangaone Valley. Since the boundary of the Horowhenua and Hutt county councils ran down the centre of that portion of the stream, councils jointly funded the construction of the bridge, with the aid of a £250 grant from the Public Works Department. It was built by Norman Campbell, a local saw miller. The plans were provided by the Public Works Department, based on a patent taken out by American Engineer William Howe in 1840. The bridge had a 27 metre span. It was built of jarrah, with steel rods, plates and bolts, and concrete abutments at either end.

The Ngatiawa Bridge continued to serve the local community until circa 1980, when a new concrete bridge was built downstream. On 5 October 2017 the bridge was completely destroyed by its sudden collapse.


Hydro Grand Hotel
Copyright: Francis Vallanceexpand/collapse

Hydro Grand Hotel, Timaru

10 The Bay Hill and Sefton Street East, Timaru
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#4215)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished November 2017.

Since its construction in 1912, the Hydro Grand Hotel had been a prominent building on the Timaru townscape and waterfront. The Hydro Grand Hotel was built in an Edwardian Mediterranean style and occupied its full triangular site on the corner of The Bay Hill and Sefton Street, overlooking Caroline Bay. The building was constructed in brick that was plastered and originally painted white. 

The building was dominated by a tower at the eastern corner, topped with a circular colonnaded balcony and dome. The north-eastern (main) façade also featured recessed balconies, bay windows and arched openings, being elements of the Edwardian Mediterranean style. Lack of maintenance and adverse engineering and safety reports led to this place's demolition.

During 2016

Cottage, 165 Tregoweth Lane, Huntly
Field Record Form Collectionexpand/collapse

Cottage, Huntly

165 Tregoweth Lane, Huntly
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#4215)

Lost to: Demolition - January 2016.

Built between 1883 and 1889, the cottage was perhaps the most intact and amongst the oldest surviving miner's cottages in the Waikato District. Unfortunately it was demolished on a spur of the moment decision by the owner in January 2016.


House, 81 Haven Road Nelson
Copyright: John Warrenexpand/collapse

House, Nelson

81 Haven Road, Nelson
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#5166)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished April 2016.

The house at 81 Haven Road was a simple single-storey villa, presumed to have been built circa 1900.

Dalgety Office Building
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Dalgety Office Building (former), Blenheim

2 Alfred Street, Sinclair Street and Grove Road, Blenheim
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#1511)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished April- June 2016.

The former Dalgety Office Building was built in 1884. It got its name after a merger between The New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency and another stock and station firm, Dalgety and Co., one of many stock and station companies that used to operate in Blenheim.


Trathern's Building
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Trathen's Building, Nelson

191 Trafalgar Street, Nelson
Originally entered in the List as a Category 2 historic place (#1617)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished July 2016.

Built in 1922, this building had been home to Trathen's department store in Nelson for over 70 years.

Te Urewera National Park Visitor Centre
Copyright: Scott Whānau.expand/collapse

Te Urewera National Park Visitor Centre (former), Lake Waikaremoana

6395 Lake Road (State Highway 38), Aniwaniwa, Lake Waikaremoana
Originally entered in the List as a Category 1 historic place (#9553)

Lost to: Redevelopment - demolished September 2016.

The former Te Urewera National Park Visitor Centre at Aniwaniwa sat amidst a rich landscape of natural beauty and cultural and traditional significance. Designed by prominent architect John Scott in the early 1970s, the building aimed to respond to the immense importance of its surroundings through carefully considered form and pathways to honour the beauty and wairua of the landscape, and function as a storehouse of invaluable taonga and the visitor gateway to New Zealand’s fourth largest national park.